The Daily Frame Archive-2015

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December 31, 2015

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“Caesars Interior no. 3 (detail)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
The Forum Shops at Caesars Palace 

“Neptune was the name that ancient Romans gave to the Greek god of the sea and earthquakes, Poseidon. He was the brother of Jupiter [Greek: Zeus] and of Pluto [Greek: Hades]. After the defeat of their father Saturn [Greek: Cronos], the three brothers divided the world in three parts to be ruled by one of the three brothers. Jupiter took the sky, Neptune the sea and Pluto the underworld. Neptune had the reputation for having a violent temper. Tempests and earthquakes were a reflection of his furious rage.”

Text from Windows to the Universe website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner will be ringing in the New Year tonight from 9 pm to 2 am at Brendan’s Irish Pub at the Orleans Hotel & Casino. She is Killian’s Angels inimitable Tubist | Bass Player.

• • •
December 30, 2015

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“Caesars Interior no. 7 (detail)”
Photograph by Jon Winet

“Roman mythology is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome’s legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. “Roman mythology” may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period.

The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The stories are often concerned with politics and morality, and how an individual’s personal integrity relates to his or her responsibility to the community or Roman state. Heroism is an important theme.”

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Director  Jon Winet  grew up with a copy of Edith Hamilton’s “Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes.

• • •
December 29, 2015

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“High Roller”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

High Roller
“Shining bright on the Las Vegas Strip, the 550-foot-tall High Roller is a true standout at The LINQ’s outdoor shopping, dining and entertainment promenade.

Measuring 520 feet in diameter, the High Roller eclipses both the London Eye and Singapore Flyer. Facing north and south (parallel to Las Vegas Boulevard), the wheel takes 30 minutes to complete one full revolution and features 28 glass-enclosed cabins with broad views of the famed resort city. Each spherical cabin can hold up to 40 people. There are benches on either side of the cabin, with plenty of floor space in between. But we imagine you’ll want to stand against the window and admire the view.”

NEW YEAR’S DAY HANGOVER RELIEF CABINS
“The High Roller will be celebrating National Hangover Day by offering Hangover Relief Cabins for $31 all day from 11:30am – 5pm. The bar cabins will offer Bloody Marys, Mimosas, and hangover relief drinks.”

Text from High Roller website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
December 28, 2015

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“Dusk from the Funk House”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

The Funk House
1228 S. Casino

Google Street View 1
Google Street View 2

March 2014 Google Street View screen grab 1    [for future archival reference]
March 2014 Google Street View screen grab 2    [for future archival reference]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner has got the funk.

• • •
December 27, 2015

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“Frenchman Mountain”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Frenchman Mountain is the highest peak in the craggy mountain range that forms the eastern border of the Las Vegas Valley. The range is composed of two peaks: Sunrise Mountain to the north and Frenchman Mountain to the south, which are separated by Lake Mead Blvd. From the perspective of town, Frenchman Mountain has two peaks: a northern lower summit (3,942 ft, actually twin peaks) and a southern true summit (4,052 ft, also twin peaklets).

Heading south from Lake Mead Blvd, the route climbs 1,300 ft to a saddle between the twin northern lower summits, drops 260 ft into the main saddle between the northern and southern summits, and then finally climbs 700 ft onto the true summit, for a total distance of 2.2 miles and 2,000 feet of elevation gain.

As might be expected for a high point overlooking a big city, there are many communications towers on the summit. There also is a dirt service road to the top. The road is closed to private vehicles, and it is the steepest dirt road that I have ever seen, so it is just as well to hike it. The road even has switchbacks that are too tight to turn around a long-wheel-base vehicle, so drivers have to pull forward up one leg, then back up the next, drive forward on the third, back up, and so on.

Because there is a road to the top, it would seem that hiking this peak would be easy, but this is the steepest, and most consistently steep, road that I have ever seen. Views of Las Vegas to the west, Lake Mead to the east, and peaks on the far horizons are worth the effort.”

Text from birdandhike.com.

Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can go off road on request.

• • •
December 26, 2015

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“Our Celestial Buddy”
Photograph by Jon Miller
December 23, 2015

December: The Cold Moon

“Winter takes a firm hold and temperatures plummet at this time. Sometimes this moon is also called the Long Night Moon as the winter nights lengthen and the moon spends more time above the horizon opposite a low sun. The full moon name often used by Christian settlers is the ‘Moon before Yule’.”

Text from MoonConnection.com.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Connection and Man at McCarran.

• • •
December 25, 2015

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“Holiday”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“A holiday is a day set aside by custom or by law on which normal activities, especially business or work, are suspended or reduced. Generally, holidays are intended to allow individuals to celebrate or commemorate an event or tradition of cultural or religious significance. Holidays may be designated by governments, religious institutions, or other groups or organizations. The degree to which normal activities are reduced by a holiday may depend on local laws, customs, the type of job being held or even personal choices.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner joins the small but valiant “Our Las Vegas” team in wishing all sparkling holidays!

• • •
December 24, 2015

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“Art Gallery”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner from her December 2015 Holiday road trip.

“Kingman (Huwaalyapay Nyava in the Mojave language) is the county seat of Mohave County, Arizona,. According to the 2010 census, the population of the city is 28,068.

Lt. Edward Fitzgerald Beale, a U.S. Navy officer in the service of the U.S. Army Corps of Topographical Engineers, was ordered by the U.S. War Department to build a federal wagon road across the 35th Parallel. His secondary orders were to test the feasibility of the use of camels as pack animals in the southwestern desert. Beale traveled through the present day Kingman in 1857 surveying the road and in 1859 to build the road. The road became part of Highway 66 and Interstate Highway 40. Remnants of the wagon road can still be seen in White Cliffs Canyon in Kingman.

Kingman, Arizona, was founded in 1882, when Arizona was still Arizona Territory.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is road tested.

• • •
December 23, 2015

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“Foxy”
Photograph and text by Sallie Douglas
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series

Foxy (originally named Tillie) was rescued from the Animal Foundation two and a half years ago…on Cinco De Mayo.

I was at an adoption event that was being held at Petsmart in Henderson, happened to see her hiding in a back corner of her cage, and just HAD to play with her in the get-aquainted room!!!

I brought Kahlua down from home to meet her, and they seemed to hit it off pretty well. The rest is history. [NB: [Kahlua is featured on a previous Daily Frame, now in the Archive.]

Foxy is part Papillon, part Pomeranian, and part Terrier. She loves to stalk birds but never kills, chase and play tug-o-war with rope toys, snuggle, and get belly rubs. We believe she is about 6 or 7 years old.”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
December 21, 2015
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“Downtown Night Lot”
Photograph by Jon Winet

USA Today story by Doyle Rice reprinted in its entirety.

“Monday’s winter solstice marks the longest night”

Here comes the dark. The winter solstice — marking the longest night and shortest day of the year — is Monday night.

The solstice occurs at the same instant everywhere on Earth. In the United States, it happens at 11:48 p.m. ET Monday (or 10:48 p.m. CT, 9:48 p.m. MT and 8:48 p.m. PT).

In Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia, that means the solstice actually comes on Tuesday.

The winter solstice is the precise moment the Northern Hemisphere is tilted its farthest from the sun all year, and usually occurs near the day when there is the least amount of daylight and the most darkness.

One of the most famous solstice celebrations occurs at the ancient Stonehenge ruins in Wiltshire, England, where druids, pagans and other revelers gather each year to celebrate the event.

The solstice is the astronomical beginning of winter — the start of the coldest three months in the Northern Hemisphere — even though meteorologists view winter as starting Dec. 1. After the solstice, the days slowly start to get longer again.

It’s the opposite in the Southern Hemisphere, where Dec. 21 marks the longest day of the year and the beginning of astronomical summer.

Winter’s shortest day, however, is typically not the coldest day of the year. There is a lag between the shortest day of the year and the coldest average temperatures for most spots in the USA.

This lag in temperature occurs because even though the amount of daylight is increasing, the Earth’s surface continues to lose more heat than it receives from the sun. In most locations across the country, the minimum daily temperature occurs around two or three weeks later, in early to mid-January.

For example, the coldest days in Boston, on average, are Jan. 17-26. In Chicago, it’s Jan. 17-20, and in Miami, it’s Jan. 2-22. At the end of January, more heat finally begins arriving than leaving, and days slowly start to warm up.

The Earth’s tilted axis causes the seasons. During the Northern Hemisphere’s winter, the land north of the equator is tilted away from the sun, which lowers the amount of the sun’s energy warming the Northern Hemisphere.

And why is the Earth tilted? It’s probably the result of collisions with various proto-planets and other massive objects during the formation of the solar system billions of years ago, according to NASA. Just a bit unsettling to realize that the reason the Earth has the perfect temperature for life to form is a few random collisions with other space rocks a few eons ago.

In the meantime, happy solstice!

“Our Las Vegas” Director  Jon Winet 

• • •
December 20, 2015

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“Fourth Street (Mexican Restaurant)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” and “Drive-by” series.

Google Street View
March 2015, Google Street View   [for future archival reference]

“I have passed this Vegas icon by for years.
Fortunately I was stuck in bumper to bumper and directly in front.
Popped in for a dinner
Absolutely fabulous
Authentic Mexican from the decor probably built like years an years
Makes you feel good inside
Tamales with rice and beans
Flan was perfect with a rum after bite
The tamales were filled with chicken and shredded beef
The tastes were just great
Trust me you don’t want to miss this experience
Old school very rare these days”

This poetic November 2015 review of Doña Maria’s Tamales by Richard A. appeared on Yelp.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was positively on 4th Street.”

• • •
December 19, 2015

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“Maryland”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” series.

Tangentially linked December 18, 2015 Las Vegas Review-Journal story by Richard N. Velotta: “Officials pursue ‘complete street’ vision for Maryland Parkway”.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner recently complained that have “too many good sunsets lately.”

• • •
December 18, 2015

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“Antigravity Yoga”
Text and Photograph by Rio Lacanlale

At Shine Alternative Fitness, located at 6451 S. Tenaya Way, Las Vegans can escape the hustle and bustle of life by transforming themselves into Cirque du Soleil aerialists for an hour. Rebecca Perrick‘s unique Antigravity Yoga classes take place on a hammock-like contraption, similar to the silks used in Cirque shows. The “hammock” acts as support, which in turn allows for deeper stretches and zero gravity yoga poses that help with blood circulation. Hang loose (literally!) with Rebecca [featured left in the photo] and other Antigravity Yoga instructors during unconventional and thrilling yoga classes. A full schedule  can be found on the Fitness center’s website.

Rio Lacanlale [featured in the foreground of the image  is a student journalist at Elevate NV Magazine, studying Journalism and Media Studies at UNLV. Rio recently moved back to Las Vegas after living in Viterbo, Italy for seven months where she studied journalism, learning Italian while interning at an international publication. After Rio graduates next fall, she hopes to move back to Italy, “il più bel paese del mondo!”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
December 17, 2015
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“Trump”
Photograph by Jon Winet
From the “Drive-by” Series.

“As the real estate mogul has done in recent debates, Donald Trump offered a measured performance stylistically different from the fiery stump speeches he delivers at rallies to supporters. And the typically confrontational businessman largely avoided tangling with his fellow contenders.

It was a safe performance for Trump, but it’s one that certainly won’t deter his supporters and won’t do anything to hurt his front-runner status.

CNN political commentator David Axelrod, a former top Obama adviser, said that while Trump didn’t meet the bar on facts and ‘linear thinking,’ he was ‘in character.’

‘I think he probably did what he needed to do,’Axelrod said, adding that it didn’t hurt that few of the candidates to Trump’s right and left were ‘eager to tangle’ with the front-runner.'”

Text from CNN report “Republican debate: Winners and losers” by Jeremy Diamond.

More:
Analysis in Slate by John Dickerson “Donald Trump Is Staying on Top for Now
The fifth Republican debate was about flexing muscle. That’s what Trump does best.”

Our Las Vegas notes that whatever the outcome of the February 23, 2016 Nevada Republican Party Caucuses, the ‎July 18–21, 2016 GOP National Convention and Tuesday, November 8, 2016 58th quadrennial  U.S. presidential election, Trump will remain a fixture in the Las Vegas’ cityscape for the foreseeable future.

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet encourages Las Vegans to attend the Caucuses on Saturday, February 20 (Democratic Party) and Tuesday, February 23 (Republican Party).

• • •
December 16, 2015

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“D Four (detail)”
Photograph by Jon Winet

From Blog Vegas:

Here’s lookin’ at you kid: Happy 20th Birthday Fremont Street Experience
December 14 story by Ashley Oñoz-Wright

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet is one of those odd early morning people.

• • •
December 15, 2015

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“Dusk”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
December 14, 2015

Ginger Bruner serves as Lead Photographer for “Our Las Vegas.”

• • •
December 14, 2015

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“Wynn”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

On news that Casino Mogul Steve Wynn had purchased one million shares of stock in his publicly traded company  [WYNN}, the Motley Fool  commented: “This is a vote of confidence in Wynn Resorts, but I’ve long thought that the company is well positioned for long-term investors. Despite the drop in gaming revenues from Macau, the tiny peninsula’s gaming market is still the most profitable in the world, and Wynn Palace should be a very solidly profitable resort when it opens. 

Maybe that’s what Wynn is bullish about, maybe he knows something we don’t, or maybe he just wants to strengthen his control of his company. Whatever the reason, I’ll stay long Wynn Resorts stock because I think it has a lot of potential for both revenue and earnings growth for long-term investors. “

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
December 13, 2015

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“Sprawl”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott

From Mountain’s Edge.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
December 12, 2015

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“It’s getting to seem a lot …”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Signs of the 2016 winter holidays in the hotel lobby | reception area of the Bellagio Hotel  – against the overhead backdrop of Dale Chihuly’s “Fiori di Como.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
December 11, 2015

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“&”
Photograph by Jon Winet
Four Queens Hotel & Casino

“An ampersand is a logogram “&” representing the conjunction word “and”, though to save confusion it is called a symbol. It originated as a ligature of the letters et, Latin for “and”.

The ampersand can be traced back to the 1st century A.D. and the Old Roman cursive, in which the letters E and T occasionally were written together to form a ligature.

Text from Wikipedia.”

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet is not a fan of autocorrection software.

• • •
December 10, 2015

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“Abbey Road Crossing in the Rain”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
El Cortez Hotel & Casino
600 E Fremont Street

Follow-up to yesterday’s  Daily Frame highlighting the DTLV Abbey Road Crossing dedication (visit our Facebook page for a look as our Archive is currently being refurbished) and with a nod to Throwback Thursday in this rain-soaked view of Fremont Street from earlier this fall.

Live Stream
July 15, 2015 Google Street View [for archival reference]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner’s has something in her style.

• • •
December 9, 2015

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“Dedication”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Abbey Road Crossing
El Cortez Hotel & Casino
600 E Fremont Street
September 8, 2015

“Approximately the same distance and width as the famous crosswalk on the cover of the Abbey Road album, Abbey Road Crossing in Las Vegas crosses Fremont Street, in the heart of the Fremont East Entertainment District, near the famous handprints of Beatles drummer Ringo Starr.”

Text from Abbey Road web site
Live Stream
July 15, 2015 Google Street View [for archival reference]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner’s life is a long and winding road.

• • •
December 8, 2015

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“Intimate Elegant Legendary”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“Celebrate your love at Chapel of the Flowers, the gorgeous top-rated venue in Las Vegas where legendary wedding, vow renewal and commitment ceremonies have taken place on the world-famous Strip for nearly 60 years.

Imagine for a moment the perfect Vegas wedding venue: elegant and serene, an oasis of bliss that is ideal for your dream ceremony. Your dream is about to come true at Chapel of the Flowers.”

Text from Chapel website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
December 7, 2015

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“Flora Dungan Humanities”
Photographed by Ginger Bruner from the Student Union

“The tallest structure on campus, the humanities building contains auditoriums, classrooms, and lecture halls on the first two floors. On the upper five floors, the building houses the offices of the president, provost, other administrative offices and departments.”

Text from UNLV website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a proud alumna of UNLV – and a producer and occasional on-air personality at KUNV.

• • •
December 6, 2015

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“Early Morning Experience”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 11, 2015

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet is an early riser.

• • •
December 5, 2015

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“Country Road”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott

Photographer and advocate of automotive aesthetics Glenn Elliott notes: “the car is a 1957 Imperial. It’s a local car, member of the local Sin City Esquires CC.”

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
December 4, 2015

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”P3 Button”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

The closing of Mikayla Whitmore’s “When the Night Comes” residency at P3 Studio in three days will mark the end of Cosmopolitan Las Vegas’ bold experiment supporting contemporary visual artists at its current highly prized location. The space will next be the site of new restaurant venture. .

The photographer notes: “Come by and make a collage button. Great fun!

One would be hard pressed to find a stronger advocate for the local art scene than “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner .

• • •
December 3, 2015

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“Annie”
Photograph and text by Sarah Shelton
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series – featured on a Thursday!

“Annie after her first grooming since being rescued from an animal kill shelter in Las Vegas. She’s very loving and happy to be running around and being the silly dog she is. She is so glad to have a forever home.”

21 year-old journalist, lyricist, singer, actress, dancer and model Sarah Shelton was born and raised in Las Vegas, Sarah has sung and headlined on stages including Ravello Lounge at the M Resort Spa Casino, Hard Rock Cafe, The Green Room, Suncoast, Sam’s Town, Violette’s Vegan, and Red Rock Country Club.

Sarah has also sung the National Anthem for nationally televised sporting events including to 75,000 people at the Nationwide Series NASCAR race at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway .

In Spring 2016, Sarah will graduate from the University of Nevada Las Vegas with a degree in broadcast Journalism & Media Studies with a minor in Business Entrepreneurship.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
December 2, 2015

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“A Girl’s Best Friend”
Photograph and text by Natasha Jones
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series

“As winter approaches, there’s no one better to snuggle with than a loving pup! Krypto is a loving pitbull-boxer mix, who belongs to Jonathan Cardona. He loves cuddling, interacting and sharing love with friends. I am lucky to have met Krypto and hope to cuddle with him for years to come.”

California native Natasha Jones is a senior at UNLV majoring in Journalism & Media Studies with a concentration in integrated marketing communications. In her spare time she is heavily involved with Alpha Xi Delta, and loves travel and music festivals.

She lived in San Diego prior to moving to Las Vegas is 2005

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
December 1, 2015

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“Gold Strat”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From Downtown Spaces

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner loves the Stratosphere – and telephone lines.

• • •
November 30, 2015

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“Desert Fall”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
November 29, 2015

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“茶”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Bagel Café

The Chinese character for tea is , originally written with an extra stroke as (pronounced tu, used as a word for a bitter herb), and acquired its current form during the Tang Dynasty as used in the eighth-century treatise on tea, The Classic of Tea.

Text from Wikipedia

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner sometimes actually does makes time for a quiet break.

• • •
November 28, 2015

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“Hops”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Hop Nuts Brewery
1120 S Main St
July 2015 Google Street View [for future reference.]

Hops are the flowers (also called seed cones or strobiles) of the hop plant Humulus lupulus. They are used primarily as a flavoring and stability agent in beer, to which they impart a bitter, tangy flavor, though they are also used for various purposes in other beverages and herbal medicine.

In the Middle Ages, beers tended to be of a very low alcohol content (small beer). In Europe, many villages had one or more small breweries with a barley field and a hop garden in close vicinity. Early documents include mention of a hop garden in the will of Charlemagne’s father, Pepin III. However, the first documented use of hops in beer is from the 9th century, though Hildegard of Bingen, 300 years later, is often cited as the earliest documented source. Before this period, brewers used “gruit”, composed of a wide variety of bitter herbs and flowers, including dandelion, burdock root, marigold, horehound (the old German name for horehound, Berghopfen, means “mountain hops”), ground ivy, and heather.

Hops are used extensively in brewing for their antibacterial effect that favors the activity of brewer’s yeast over less desirable microorganisms and for many purported benefits, including balancing the sweetness of the malt with bitterness, contributing a variety of desirable flavors and aromas. Historically, traditional herb combinations for beers were believed to have been abandoned when beers made with hops were noticed to be less prone to spoilage.

The hop plant is a vigorous, climbing, herbaceous perennial, usually trained to grow up strings in a field called a hopfield, hop garden (nomenclature in the South of England), or hop yard (in the West Country and U.S.) when grown commercially. Many different varieties of hops are grown by farmers around the world, with different types being used for particular styles of beer.

Text from Wikipedia

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner appreciates a fine dry stout beer.

• • •
November 27, 2015

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“From My Daily Walk in the Neighborhood”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré
Bonita Avenue
March 2015 Google Street View [for future reference.]

“The top of the tower has two observation decks, “Top of the World,” a revolving restaurant, and four thrill rides:

Big Shot at 1,081 ft is the highest thrill ride in the world.
Insanity, opened in 2005, at 900 ft is the second highest thrill ride in the world; it dangles riders over the edge of the tower and then spins in a circular pattern at approximately forty miles per hour. In two separate incidents in 2005, riders were left dangling several hundred feet above the Las Vegas Strip for nearly an hour and a half when Insanity shut down. The ride did not malfunction, but was programmed to cease operation if a fault or problem is detected by the ride’s control system.
SkyJump Las Vegas, a controlled-descent, Bungee-jumping-like ride that will allow riders to plummet 855 ft attached to a high-speed descent wire. SkyJump opened on April 20, 2010.
X-Scream –“Ever played on a giant teeter-totter, 866 feet above the ground?”

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
November 26, 2015

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“HELP HQ”
Photograph and text by Bianca Cseke

HELP of Southern Nevada is a nonprofit organization providing human services to low-income families and individuals in the Las Vegas valley.

The organization, started by the Junior League of Las Vegas and incorporated in 1970,  just completed its annual turkey and grocery drive. The results of the drive help 1,200 families have a dinner on Thanksgiving they would not have been able to afford otherwise.

Bianca Cseke is in her second year at UNLV, where she is a Journalism and English dual major with a minor in management. She plans to have a career in investigative journalism. When she isn’t busy writing, Bianca enjoys attending concerts.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 25, 2015

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“Old Friend”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series
Early Fall 2015

Lucy Furr, basking in the heat, which she loves.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is Lucy’s best friend.

• • •
November 24, 2015

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“LOVE (in the wings)”
Photograph and text by Ashtyn Marlow

The Cirque du Soleil’s LOVE at the Mirage is a celebration of the musical legacy of The Beatles. This 2006 production combines theatrics, dance, aerial stunts, and even extreme sports all set to the reproduced and reimagined music of The Beatles by their legendary producer Sir George Martin.

Las Vegas born Ashtyn Marlow, raised in Tonopah, is a senior at UNLV majoring in journalism and media studies. After graduating she hopes to write about and review video games. Until then, you can catch her working retail, listening to The Beatles or playing video games.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 23, 2015

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“24 Hours”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
From the “Drive-by” Series.

3785 South Las Vegas Blvd
Archived Google Street View [for future reference.]

“The Personalized Printer offers an array of 16 vibrant colors as well as 14 printable Las Vegas icons such as the famous “Welcome to Las Vegas” sign, a deck of cards, wedding bells, champagne and more. Additionally, guests can personalize M&M’S with their names, a special message or date, or any other text that fits on two lines (eight characters per line). The process is easy and quick – it takes about two minutes to create a small moment of joy.”

Text from M&M’s World Las Vegas website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room

• • •
November 22, 2015

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“Just North of Town”
Photograph by Justin McAffee

“North is a noun, adjective, or adverb indicating direction or geography. North is one of the four cardinal directions or compass points. It is the opposite of south and is perpendicular to east and west.”

“By convention, the top side of a map is often north.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
November 21, 2015

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“World Market”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

World Market Center Las Vegas is a 5-million-square-foot showcase for the home and hospitality contract furnishings industry in downtown Las Vegas. It is the largest showroom complex in the world for the home and hospitality furnishings industry, serving domestic and international sellers and buyers.

World Market Center is owned by International Market Centers, L.P. (IMC).

Las Vegas Market  is the the major trade show hosted by the World Market Center Las Vegas.

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner shares a comfy couch with her feline sidekick Lucy.

• • •
November 20, 2015

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“Light Pole | Stratosphere Sunset”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
November 17, 2015
From the “Drive-by” Series.

The success of certain pictures — pictures that make the viewer say, ‘‘Damn it,’’ and wonder how such things are possible — comes from a combination of tutored intuition and good luck.

— Teju Cole

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner roams the streets of the Radiant City in search of the decisive moment.

• • •
November 19, 2015

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“Artisan Craft Festival”
Photograph and text by Natalia Lancellotti

The annual Artisan Craft Festival at Suncoast Resort featured the unique works of local artists and craftmakers. Among the dozens of vendors’ tables, one-of-a-kind pieces included woodwork, glass sculptures and ornaments, bead work, pottery, knitting, quilts and other products of varied craftsmanship. Just in time to get a loved one a distinctly original present for the holidays, the Artisan Craft Festival was abundant with interesting gifts. It was truly a display of the valley’s finest local artistry.

Natalia Lancellotti is a junior at UNLV majoring in journalism and media studies. She moved from Argentina when she was 14 years old and has lived in Las Vegas since then. She has been happily married to Jorge Roa. They both share a passion for soccer.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 18, 2015

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“Sonic Sunset”

Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-by” Series – Italian-American Club Parking Area
“There’s never one sunrise the same or one sunset the same.”
— Carlos Santana 

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner rarely misses a photo op.

• • •
November 17, 2015

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“Soul Men”
Photograph and text by Wesley Knight

35 years ago, Jake and Elwood Blues set out to raise $5,000 to save the orphanage they grew up in. Their “mission from God” saw them cross paths with a levitating nun, Illinois Nazis, a hot-tempered country band, a supermodel, a farcical amount of police officers, a homicidal mystery woman; and music legends like James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Cab Calloway and John Lee Hooker – wreaking deadpan, dry-humored havoc the whole way.

The cult-classic Blues Brothers have cemented their place in pop culture history, and are now immortalized in these statues found at Sherman’s House of Antiques in Boulder City with the hefty price tag of $3,500.

Sherman’s House of Antiques debuted in the Historic District of Boulder City in 2010, right before the antique store boom took place. Even with an antique on almost every corner (nine total, to be exact), Sherman’s stands out thanks to its corner store display featuring the legendary soul men alongside pirate skeleton, armor-clad knight and Roman gladiator statues.

Local businesses like the numerous antique stores, eateries and hobby shops characterize Boulder City as much more than the drive-thru on the way to the Hoover Dam. The city that built the Dam serves as a reminder to tourists and residents alike that life doesn’t have to move at a breakneck speed to be enjoyable.

Like blues icon Louis Jordan sang decades ago: Let the good times roll!

Wesley Knight is a junior at UNLV majoring in Journalism & Media Studies with a focus in print. Originally from Federal Way, Washington, he moved to  Boulder City in 2002. He divides his time between collecting movies, retro video games and music along with his lifelong obsession with professional wrestling.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 16, 2015

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“View from the Tommy Wind Theater”
Photograph by Sally Douglas.

map
Tommy Wind Theater

Neil Diamond – The Tribute
“Long time Las Vegas entertainer, Rob Garrett, has been performing his Neil Diamond tribute to audiences around the world since 1995. He has become the most popular and most requested Neil Diamond tribute act in the business and known worldwide as the “King of Diamonds”. Like his iconic counterpart, Rob was born and raised in New York City. His physical and vocal resemblance to the legendary singer/songwriter is uncanny. In 2013, Rob was awarded the “Tribute Act of the Year” award in Las Vegas, marking the first time the honor was given to any tribute act.”

Text from Theater website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
November 15, 2015

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“Paris”
Photograph by Justin McAffee.

In continuing solidarity with the people of France and with all the refugees and citizens of the world living in war-torn spots we feature Justin’s photograph of the Paris Las Vegas Eiffel Tower, first published on the Daily Frame on July 14, 2015.

Paris is the capital and most-populous city of France. Situated on the Seine River, in the north of the country, it is in the centre of the Île-de-France region, also known as the région parisienne, “Paris Region”. The City of Paris has a population of 2,241,346 within its city limits.

Paris was founded in the 3rd century BC by a Celtic people called the Parisii, who gave the city its name. By the 12th century, Paris was the largest city in the western world, a prosperous trading centre, and the home of the University of Paris, one of the first in Europe. In the 18th century, it was the centre stage for the French Revolution, and became an important centre of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts, a position it still retains today.

The Paris Region had a GDP of €624 billion (US $687 billion) in 2012, accounting for 30.0 percent of the GDP of France, and ranking it as one of the wealthiest five regions in Europe; it is the banking and financial centre of France, and contains the headquarters of 29 of the 31 companies in France ranked in the 2015 Fortune Global 500.

Paris is the home of the most visited art museum in the world, the Louvre, as well as the Musée d’Orsay and Cluny – National Museum of the Middle Ages. The notable architectural landmarks of Paris include Notre Dame Cathedral (12th century); the Sainte-Chapelle (13th century); the Eiffel Tower (1889); and the Basilica of Sacré-Cœur on Montmartre (1914).

In 2014 Paris received 22.4 million visitors, making it one of the world’s top tourist destinations. Paris is also known for its fashion, particularly the twice-yearly Paris Fashion Week, and for its haute cuisine, and three-star restaurants. Most of France’s major universities and grandes écoles are located in Paris, as are France’s most important newspapers, including Le Monde, Libération and Charlie Hebdo.

Text excerpted and adapted from Wikipedia.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
November 14, 2015

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“Vive la France”
Photograph by Sailor Helms.

France, officially the French Republic (French: République française), is a sovereign state comprising territory in western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The European part of France, called Metropolitan France, extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. France has a population of 67 million. It is a unitary semi-presidential republic with the capital in Paris, the country’s largest city and main cultural and commercial center. The Constitution of France establishes the state as secular and democratic, with its sovereignty derived from the people.

France became Europe’s dominant cultural, political, and military power under Louis XIV. In the late 18th century, however, the monarchy was overthrown in the French Revolution. Among its legacies was the Declaration of Human and Civic Rights (also known as the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen), one of the earliest documents on human rights, which expresses the nation’s ideals to this day. France became one of modern history’s earliest republics.

Throughout its long history, France has been a leading global center of culture, making significant contributions to art, science, and philosophy.

French citizens enjoy a high standard of living, and the country performs well in international rankings of education, health care, life expectancy, civil liberties, and human development. France is a founding member of the United Nations

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

Sailor Leslie Helms is a Las Vegas native. She is a sophomore at West Technical Academy in Summerlin.

In solidarity with the people of France, we feature Ms. Helms’ photograph of the Paris Las Vegas Eiffel Tower, first published on the Daily Frame on August 4, 2014.

• • •
November 13, 2015

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“Looking West”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
From the “Las Vegas Skies” series.

“Today…November 10…looking west from St. Rose Pkwy.”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Her artwork is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
November 12, 2015

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“99¢”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner prefers Route 44 Iced Tea to Slurpees.

• • •
November 11, 2015

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“Rascal”
Photograph and text by Tara Walker
From the “Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series”

Rascal is an eight year-old Australian Heeler mix. His favorite sport is tennis and he loves Serena Williams! He grabs a front seat every time she has a match. He loves taking walks and playing with his toys.

Tara Walker is a senior at UNLV majoring in journalism and media studies. She moved from California to the Radiant City in 2004. She plans to have a career in radio broadcasting.

She is a mother of two daughters, aged 17 and 25. She is a life-long Prince fan, and enjoys basketball, watching the news and debating.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 10, 2015

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“Edge of Town”
Photograph by Justin McAffee

The photographer notes: “[This]one on the edge of town is right on the edge of the last housing developments along the 95 going north to Mt. Charleston.”

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
November 9, 2015

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“Clark County Library”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“A library is a collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, prints, documents, microform, CDs, cassettes, videotapes, DVDs, Blu-ray Discs, e-books, audiobooks, databases, and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items.”

“The first libraries consisted of archives of the earliest form of writing—the clay tablets in cuneiform script discovered in temple rooms in Sumer, some dating back to 2600 BC. These archives, which mainly consisted of the records of commercial transactions or inventories, mark the end of prehistory and the start of history.”

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

• map of Sumer

• map of Iraq

Clark County Library District

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a card-carrying library patron.

• • •
November 8, 2015

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“Vegas Valley Comic Book Festival”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
November 7, 2015
Clark County Library

In case you missed it: Guests at the November 7, 2015 Festival: Matt Wagner (Will Eisner’s The Spirit), Jen Van Meter (Hopeless Savages), Chris Staros (Top Shelf Productions), Russell Lissau (Old Wounds), Dan Schkade (San Hannibal), Spencer Brinkerhoff III (Studios B3), Ben Saunders (University of Oregon) and Shannon Watters (BOOM! Studios), plus live music by The DoubleClicks and Molly Lewis.

Full Schedule

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner played the aftershow. One supsects she may have some comic books squirreled away at an undisclosed location.

• • •
November 7, 2015

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“Tippy Elvis’ Sean C. Jones”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

They’re back: Tippy Elvis – Las Vegas’ seminal 20th century art band featuring the Radiant City’s hippest-of-the-hip hipsters – including cartoonist Sean C. Jones on keyboards.

Tippy Elvis performs tonight at Geekapalooza at the Dive Bar – 4110 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, Nevada 89119.

Ginger Bruner provides some backstory: “We’re performing in support of a Comic Book Festival and we have an awesome cartoonist in our keyboard player who has actually illustrated our song lyrics in comic book form! So THAT’s why we’re playing this show! Also, we work cheap.”

Archived March 2015 Google Street View [for future reference.]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is Tippy Elvis’ tubaist.

• • •
November 6, 2015

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“Medical Center Wet Down”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
November 4, 2015

March 2015 Google Street View.

Wet down: The practice of hosing down roads and sidewalks for night shoots so that the light will reflect off of them.

Text from the International Film & Television School • Paris glossary.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is ready for your close-up.

• • •
November 5, 2015

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“Sunset & Eastern”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
October 2015

The artist comments: “THIS is why Sunset and Eastern are a mess.”

The patience behind the wheel of “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is at times tried by traffic in the Radiant City.

• • •
November 4, 2015

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“Penn & Teller Theater Lobby View”
Photograph by Jon Winet
Rio All Suite Hotel & Casino
September 2015

“Together since 1975, Penn & Teller debuted in Las Vegas in 1993 and have been performing at the Rio since 2001. They are currently the longest-running headliners to play in the same Las Vegas hotel.

The two are winners of an Emmy, Obie, and Writer’s Guild award and also have their very own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Their Showtime series, “Penn & Teller: BS!” was the networks longest-running series and was nominated for 16 Emmy awards. They currently have two series on TV, “Penn & Teller: Fool Us” on The CW and “Wizard Wars” on SyFy. On top of all these accolades, Penn & Teller had three successful Broadway runs and two sold-out tours of England. Entertainment Weekly also included them on its “50 Funniest Comedians Alive” list.

Fun facts: Penn attended Ringling Bros, Barnum & Bailey Clown College. And contrary to Teller’s silence, he actually taught Latin class in high school. They’ve also appeared on Late Night with David Letterman more than 25 times.”

Text from Penn & Teller website.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet has nothing up his sleeve.

• • •
November 3, 2015

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“Artificial Bird Adoption Center”
Photograph and text by Colleen Storm

The Writer’s Block is an independently owned, eclectic bookstore in Downtown Las Vegas. Located on Fremont Street, the bookstore is full of brand new, contemporary fiction novels, history, philosophy, children’s books and more. There are numerous one-of-a-kind artificial birds perching atop the exposed wooden rafters of the shop. Each bird has its own adoption paperwork and certificate detailing the bird’s personality, likes/dislikes and their name. No two birds are the same. The owners also host free writing workshops for children ages 5 to 18 a couple of times a week. Children can write their own stories, songs or plays and the Writer’s Block produce books, CD’s and screenplays of the final product for the kids to take home.

Colleen Storm is completing her final semester at UNLV. She is a Communication Studies major and Journalism minor. She hopes to move to southern California in the next few years to pursue a career in the music industry – and dreams of one day opening her own recording studio.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
November 2, 2015

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“ポケットモンスタ”
Photograph by Jon Winet
Circus Circus Midway
March 2014

Pokémon (ポケモン)is a media franchise owned by The Pokémon Company, and created by Satoshi Tajiri in 1995. It is centered on fictional creatures called “Pokémon”, which humans capture and train to fight each other for sport.

The franchise began as a pair of video games for the original Game Boy, developed by Game Freak and published by Nintendo. The franchise now spans video games, trading card games, animated television shows and movies, comic books, and toys. Pokémon is the second-most successful and lucrative video game-based media franchise in the world, behind only Nintendo’s Mario franchise.

The name Pokémon is the romanized contraction of the Japanese brand Pocket Monsters (ポケットモンスター Poketto Monsutā?). The term Pokémon, in addition to referring to the Pokémon franchise itself, also collectively refers to the 721 known fictional species that have made appearances in Pokémon media as of the release of the sixth generation titles Pokémon X and Y.

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet‘s favorite Pokémon character is Pichu.

• • •
November 1, 2015

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“Twins”
Photograph of and by Ginger Bruner

“Twins are two offspring produced by the same pregnancy. Twins can either be monozygotic (“identical”), meaning that they can develop from just one zygote that will then split and form two embryos, or dizygotic (“fraternal”), meaning that they can develop from two different eggs, each are fertilized by separate sperm cells.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is sui generis.

• • •
October 31, 2015

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“Selfie”
Photograph of and by Andrea Lipomi

Text excerpted from a lengthy entry in Wikipedia:

Today’s Halloween customs are thought to have been influenced by folk customs and beliefs from the Celtic-speaking countries, some of which are believed to have pagan roots. Jack Santino, a folklorist, writes that “there was throughout Ireland an uneasy truce existing between customs and beliefs associated with Christianity and those associated with religions that were Irish before Christianity arrived”. Historian Nicholas Rogers, exploring the origins of Halloween, notes that while “some folklorists have detected its origins in the Roman feast of Pomona, the goddess of fruits and seeds, or in the festival of the dead called Parentalia, it is more typically linked to the Celtic festival of Samhain”, which comes from the Old Irish for ‘summer’s end’. Samhain (pronounced sah-win or sow-in) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. It was held on or about 31 October – 1 November and a kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts; called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany. Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century, and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.”

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is an alumna of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY; and the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas. You couldn’t ask for a better neighbor.

Today we add: Andrea is not a stranger to Star Trek conventions.

• • •
October 30, 2015

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“Peppermill Apparition”
Photograph by Jon Miller

“Halloween, a contraction of “All Hallows’ Evening” is a a yearly celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows’ Day.

Typical contemporary festive Halloween activities include trick-or-treating, attending costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins into jack-o’-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing and divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories and watching horror films.”

Text excerpted and adapted from Wikipedia.

In case there were any doubt, Halloween is upon us.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

He and fellow Daily Frame contributor and Peppermill patron Andrea Lipomi are co-conspirators in fun and adventure.

• • •
October 29, 2015
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“Panic! at the Disco”
Photograph and text by Alexis Page

Lead singer Brendon Urie of local Las Vegas band Panic! at The Disco on screen and on stage at Wine Amplified October 9th at the MGM Resorts Village.

Fans got to enjoy the band while tasting various wines.

Alexis Page is a Senior at UNLV studying Journalism and Media Studies minoring in business marketing. Alexis was born and raised in Las Vegas. She is involved in numerous UNLV organizations including her sorority Zeta Tau Alpha, Society for Professional Journalists, campus chapter of the American Marketing Association, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and Kappa Tau Alpha Journalism Honor Society among others.

In her free time Alexis loves to travel, take photos, and spend time with her family and friends.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
October 28, 2015

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“Bocce Sunset”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Just west of the Las Vegas Italian American Social Club, just south of Jaycee Park, site of spirited Wednesday Bocce matches.

Bocce is the official sport of the “Our Las Vegas” crew. Visit the Italian American Social Club website for more information.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a fierce Bocce player.

• • •
October 27, 2015

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“Dim Sum”
Photograph and accompanying text by Denise Hernandez

A special dim sum item at Orchids Garden Chinese Restaurant: Steamed Chicken Feet. The flesh of the foot is usually what’s eaten and is prepared in a black bean sauce.”

Denise Hernandez is sophomore at UNLV, majoring in Journalism – and is considering going to medical school. She notes: “I chose journalism as my major instead of something science-related because writing has always been one of my strengths and I wanted to be able to explore something that I have never had any exposure to.”

Denise is an amateur cosplayer, currently working on two costumes for a convention in January.

Her family has been going to Orchids Garden since moving to Las Vegas ten years ago.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
October 26, 2015

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“Lot”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

In real estate, a lot or plot is a tract or parcel of land owned or meant to be owned. A lot a parcel of real property. Owners of a lot can be one or more person(s) or another legal entity, such as a company/corporation, organization, government, or trust.

A lot may also be defined as a small area of land that is empty except for pavement or similar improvement.

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps track of empty spaces in the Radiant City.

• • •
October 25, 2015

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“Stormy Lot”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

According to Wikipedia, the word storm come from the Proto-Germanic “sturmaz” meaning “noise, tumult”.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner drives safely in stormy weather.

• • •
October 24, 2015

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“Frenchman Mountain (McCarran Terminal 3 View)”
Photograph and text by Ginger Bruner

“Made up of rocks similar to those found on the bottom of the Grand Canyon, Frenchman Mountain formed when faulting elevated and tilted the rocks followed by erosion, giving it its sharp triangular profile. It is the site of the Great Unconformity with the tilted Paleozoic strata underlain by Paleoproterozoic Vishnu Schist, which is some of the oldest rock on the North American continent, having been created about two billion years ago.

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can drive to McCarran in her sleep.

• • •
October 23, 2015

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“Luxor Beam | Lightpole”
Photograph and text by Sallie Douglas

“It’s like driving a car at night. You never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”

— E. L. Doctorow

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
October 22, 2015

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“The Fremont Canon”
Photograph and text by Wyatt Tomchek

The Fremont Cannon is a rivalry trophy competed over by the University of Nevada-Las Vegas and the University of Nevada-Reno. The cannon is a replica of a 19th century howitzer cannon was used on an expedition by explorer John C. Fremont while he was in Nevada.

The cannon weighs around 545 pounds and cost $10,000 to make, thus making it the heaviest and most expensive trophy in all of college football. UNR won the first game of the rivalry in 1969, but the cannon construction was not yet complete and the first game fought over the cannon was won by UNLV in 1970 by a score of 42-30. The cannon once fired rounds during games but does not anymore after an accident in 2000 where Rebel fans tried to carry the cannon but failed miserably and dropped the cannon and broke it.

UNR currently leads the series in head to head matches with a 24-17 edge over UNLV. The Rebels currently own possession of the cannon winning this year’s away game 23-17, hence the red paint job.

Wyatt Tomchek, 21, is a journalism major with a focus in print. He is currently a junior though plans on graduating next spring. He works as Student Equipment Manager for the UNLV football team, and aspires to become a sports journalist – with a “dream goal of being a play-by-play announcer.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
October 21, 2015

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“18b Balcony View no. 6”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“The Las Vegas Arts District is an approximate 18-block neighborhood located in the area south of downtown Las Vegas, roughly bounded by Commerce Street, Hoover Avenue, 4th Street, Las Vegas Boulevard and Colorado Avenue. Of course, The Las Vegas Arts District is more than a physical boundary. For everyone who lives, works or visits here, 18b is a shared vision, for which no boundaries apply.”

Text from 18b.org website

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner supports the arts and entertainment-related businesses of the 18b.

• • •
October 20, 2015

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“Crosswalk Safety”
Photograph and text by Victoria Duran
October 5, 2015 • UNLV at Maryland Parkway

CCSD School Police Officer Robert Mayer, Trooper Chelsea Stuenkel, Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Sergeant Peter Kisfalvi are working together towards pedestrian safety awareness. Their multi- jurisdictional effort includes a three part approach of education, prevention and enforcement. “We want everybody to see that we’re working together and that it’s important to everybody,” said Mayer.

Native Las Vegan Victoria Duran is a senior at UNLV majoring in Journalism & Media Studies. She is a self-proclaimed traveler, food connoisseur and fitness fanatic. She adds: “I also do trade show, promotional and print modeling and I recently was in a commercial for Vegas.com. I’m number 11 out of 12 children (yes, we are all from the same mom and dad), and I wouldn’t be who I am today without my close-knit family. My father owns El Burrito Mexican Restaurant that opened in 1969. The original location was on Fremont street and run by my grandfather.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

This is Ms. Duran’s first contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
October 19, 2015

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“The View From Mayor’s Office no. 1”
Photograph by Aimee Riley McAffee

The Smith Center’s board of directors passionately worked on this project for more than a decade. While the board of directors has since changed, the original board when The Smith Center opened its doors in 2012 was composed of the following 18 exceptional individuals; Chairman Donald D. Snyder, Vice Chairman Dr. Keith G. Boman, Secretary Kim Sinatra, Treasurer Charles L. Atwood, Gary N. Jacobs, Senator Richard Bryan, Alan M. Feldman, Robert Forbuss, Nancy Houssels, Scott Y. MacTaggart, Richard H. Plaster, Johnathan S. Halkyard, Jacqulyn C. Shropshire, Roger P. Thomas, Rose Mckinney-James, Sig Rogich, Diana Bennett, and Cedric Crear.

Myron G. Martin, who has remained The Smith Center’s President and CEO from the beginning, has an extensive background in production and performing arts center management.

The Smith Center is funded by a public-private partnership.

Public Sector: The city of Las Vegas provided land, infrastructure, environmental clean-up, and parking to the project and the city of Las Vegas, Clark County and State Legislature collaborated on a car rental fee that resulted in a bond of $105 million – a combined City commitment total of $170 million.

Private Sector: In 2005, The Donald W. Reynolds Foundation granted the project a landmark gift of $50 million in honor of their chairman, Fred W. Smith, and his wife, Mary. This incredible donation led our private funding campaign. Since then, the Reynolds Foundation has continued their generosity, pledging an additional $100 million grant to help complete the campus. This gift is the largest philanthropic donation in state history, and combined with their initial contribution, makes it the second largest donation to the performing arts in the United States.

These amazing private and public donations were essential to the production of the awe-inspiring center that we have today, and it is donations that The Smith Center continues to receive from a variety of companies, organizations, and private citizens that keep the center thriving today in the heart of our culturally-evolving city. Our vision of a world-class arts center has come true, and we have the art-loving community of Downtown Las Vegas to thank for it.”

Text from Smith Center website.

Aimee Riley McAffee was born in Honolulu, Hawai’i, grew up in the suburbs of Dallas, Texas, then matured in San Jose, California before arriving in Las Vegas 11 years ago. She is the Editor-in-Chief of adventurenevada.com and recently starting writing as a guest contributor to Las Vegas Food and Beverage Professional Magazine.

• • •
October 18, 2015

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“Nature Study no. 1”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis

“The Las Vegas Wash is the final link in the Las Vegas Valley’s water supply. It carries the valley’s excess water – an average of more than 150 million gallons a day – through the wetlands on its way to Lake Mead. That’s a lot of water! Keeping this water clean is important to all of us. This water supports acres of wetlands, creating not only an oasis for a variety of plant and animal species in the middle of the Mojave Desert, but also a crucial cleansing point for the runoff. Water from the valley, especially urban runoff, picks up fertilizer residue, oil and grease from the streets and other contaminants as it makes its way to the Wash. Wetlands vegetation helps clean the water that comes from the valley by polishing and filtering for the water, reducing pollutants as the water travels toward Lake Mead.”

Text from Las Vegas Wash Coordination Committee website.

Daily Frame contributor artist Lisa Stamanis served as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs for over twenty-five years.

Her vital role in the development of arts and culture can be felt and seen across the Radiant City.

• • •
October 17, 2015

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“View from the Bellagio Staff Parking Structure”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Bellagio was conceived by Steve Wynn and built by his company, Mirage Resorts, Inc. following the purchase and demolition of the legendary Dunes hotel and casino in October 27, 1993 after the grand opening of Luxor Las Vegas. Bellagio was designed by DeRuyter Butler and Atlandia Design. Construction on the Bellagio began in May 1996. Bellagio had an original construction cost of US$1.6 billion.

The interior design on the Bellagio was designed by Architectural Digest 100 four time winner Roger Thomas. Roger Thomas is the executive vice president of design for Wynn Design & Development, and principal of the Roger Thomas Collection.

Bellagio opened on October 15, 1998, just before 11 pm, in a ceremony that was reported to cost US$88 million.

Text from Wikipedia.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
October 16, 2015

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“Collision Masters”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Atlantic at Sahara
Google Street View.
Archived April 2015 Google Street View. [for future reference.]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is an ace driver.

• • •
October 15, 2015

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“Shakes”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Fremont Street East Facing East
Google Street View.
Archived July 2015 Google Street View. [for future reference.]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can pack a whole lotta fun into her long and adventurous days.

• • •
October 14, 2015

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“Vdara-Cosmopolitan-Aria | Jam “
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

The photographer notes: “Traffic jam during my morning commute to Bellagio…coming off the Trop-Frank Sinatra exit. Big time construction project going on!!!!”

more | up ahead: story by Alan Snel in the August 3, 2015 Casino City Times:
“Las Vegas arena planners must get creative to handle traffic, parking”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
October 13, 2015

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“Debate Set”
Photograph by Jessica Segovia

First-time Daily Frame contributor Jessica Segovia was on the set of tonight’s CNN Democratic Party presidential debate at Wynn. [5:30 p.m. PDT live on CNN and CNNgo]

We’ll post additional “behind the scenes” photographs by Ms. Segovia throughout the day on our Facebook page.

Jessica Segovia is a senior at UNLV in the School of Journalism & Media Studies.

She notes: “I’m a traveler, food addict and most importantly an aspiring journalist.

I’ve always had a thirst for new cultures and stories. It led me to my major at UNLV. I’ve worked in the food and hospitality industry for eight years in Las Vegas while traveling. I am influenced by film, books and nature.

I don’t know exactly where my journalism wings will take me but I enjoy being informative and producing content. I am open to all the possibilities and one day hope to have the opportunity to work for a travel/food publication as a writer, blogger or food stylist.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
October 12, 2015

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“The View From Mayor’s Office no. 2”
Photograph by Aimee Riley McAffee

Carolyn Goldmark Goodman (born March 25, 1939) is an American politician. She is the mayor of Las Vegas, Nevada since 2011. She is the wife of former mayor and attorney Oscar Goodman, and the second female mayor of Las Vegas.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Bryn Mawr College in 1961. Carolyn and Oscar Goodman moved to Las Vegas from Philadelphia in 1964. She graduated the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 1973 with a master’s degree in counseling.

She is the founder, president and trustee emeritus of The Meadows School. On June 7, 2011, she was elected Mayor of Las Vegas with 60 percent of the vote; she assumed office on July 6, 2011.

She received the 2009 Commitment to Education award from the United Way of Southern Nevada.

On October 24, 2011, Goodman greeted President Barack Obama at McCarran Airport. In regard to negative remarks President Obama made about Las Vegas two years earlier that had angered Goodman’s husband Oscar, the previous mayor, she told Obama that ‘the slate is brand new and clean’, and gave him one of her lucky mayor chips as a gift.

Carolyn and Oscar Goodman have four children and six grandchildren.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Aimee Riley McAffee was born in Honolulu, Hawai’i, grew up in the suburbs of Dallas, Texas, then matured in San Jose, California before arriving in Las Vegas 11 years ago. She is the Editor-in-Chief of adventurenevada.com and recently starting writing as a guest contributor to Las Vegas Food and Beverage Professional Magazine.

• • •
October 11, 2015

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“Balloon Sky”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi
September 25, 2015

“Surprise in the skies: Creative balloon freaks out observers”
Reported by: Sergio Avila

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is an alumna of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY; and the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas. You couldn’t ask for a better neighbor.

• • •
October 10, 2015

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“Forum Shops no. 1”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

The Forum Shops at Caesars (also known as simply “The Forum”) is a 636,000-square-foot hopping mall connected to Caesars Palace on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The mall was built as an extension wing of the main hotel and casino in 1992. The idea was first suggested by Henry Gluck, who served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Caesars World from 1983 to 1994. The Forum was expanded further in 2004 to front Las Vegas Boulevard on the Strip.

The Forum Shops at Caesars is the highest grossing mall in the United States, with higher sales per square foot than Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, California. The mall includes more than 270 mid-range and luxury retailers, gourmet restaurants, and bars.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a good sport. She refers to the Forum as “the land of tourists.”

• • •
October 9, 2015

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“The Ultimate Fighter”
Photograph by Jon Winet

The Las Vegas Deuce on the Strip, also referred to as The Deuce, is Las Vegas’ mode of transportation for both locals and visitors along the famous Las Vegas Strip. Run by the Regional Transportation Commission (RTC), the Las Vegas Deuce is probably the least expensive way to sight-see along the Vegas Strip.

The Deuce runs up and down the Vegas strip, 24 hours a day from the Fremont Street Experience in Downtown Las Vegas all the way to the Mandalay Bay, stopping at virtually every hotel and casino along the Las Vegas strip.

Deuce on the Strip stops are located about every quarter mile in each direction of the Vegas strip and are marked with signs or by bus shelters.”

Text from Las Vegas – The How To website.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet is a fierce advocate of public transportation. “Second only to cycling.”

• • •
October 8, 2015

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“Belver, Rafat, Bench.”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“The UNLV Department of Art studio faculty, Catherine Angel, Tim Bavington, José Bellver, Jeff Burden, Pasha Rafat, Dave Rowe, Sang Seo, Jessica Starkey and Helga Watkins are featured in this exhibition with examples of their recent investigations. These talented and award-winning artists work in a range of media in painting, photography, drawing and sculpture to video, graphic design and neon.*”

The exhibition ends this Saturday, October 10.

* Text from Donna Beam Gallery website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner at times catches views obliquely.

• • •
October 7, 2015

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“Cosmopolitan Pool View no. 2”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Britney: Piece of Me is the first residency show by American singer Britney Spears, performed at The AXIS auditorium located in the Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada. The show began on December 27, 2013.

The residency was confirmed on September 17, 2013, during an interview on Good Morning America. For the announcement, an elaborate stunt was staged in the desert surrounding Las Vegas (costing over $100,000 to produce). Over 1,000 Spears look-a-likes were gathered to perform a card routine, that reportedly could be seen from space. Spears arrived via helicopter and gave an interview to Good Morning America.”

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner makes the most of her time on the planet.

• • •

October 6, 2015

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“Tuba”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Prussian Patent No. 19 was granted to Wilhelm Friedrich Wieprecht and Johann Gottfried Moritz (1777–1840) on September 12, 1835 for a “basstuba” in F1. The original Wieprecht and Moritz instrument used five valves of the Berlinerpumpen type that were the forerunners of the modern piston valve.

The tuba (UK /ˈtjuːbə/ or US /ˈtuːbə/;[1] Italian pronunciation: [ˈtuːba]) is the largest and lowest-pitched musical instrument in the brass family. Sound is produced by vibrating or “buzzing” the lips into a large cupped mouthpiece. It first appeared in the mid 19th-century, making it one of the newer instruments in the modern orchestra and concert band.

Tuba is Latin for ‘trumpet.’

A person who plays the tuba is known as a tubaist or tubist.[

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a tubaist. She gets especially busy each year during Oktoberfest.

• • •
October 5, 2015

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“Cosmopolitan Balcony View”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Cosmopolitan Las Vegas

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was poolside.

• • •
October 4, 2015

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“Oktoberfest”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
October 3, 2015

2015 Las Vegas Oktoberfest sponsored by City of Las Vegas and the German American Social Club of Southern Nevada.

2006 Metal sculpture, “Monument to the Simulacrum” by Stephen Hendee

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer and musician Ginger Bruner is in the band Oompoporama – among others.

• • •
October 3, 2015

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“Available”
Photograph by Joanne Lentino

“Built in 1940 the Diamond Inn Motel (then it was called the Desert Isle Motel), is one of the oldest buildings still standing on the strip, which several decades ago the strip was called Arrowhead Highway/Highway 91. The first hotel/casino built on the strip was called the El Rancho Vegas Hotel & Casino built in 1941. Later in the ’40’s and 50’s, dozens of motels were built next door, the Mirage, Lone Palm, Desert Rose and many others that were the high points of Old Vegas with their glittering neon signs. The Diamond Inn is still standing proud and operating with a profit after all these years, along with its colorful history (especially the landmark, iconic Pink Elephant)!”

Text from Motel website.

Joanne Lentino, former Las Vegas resident, dancer and American Guild of Variety Artists organizer, served for seventeen years as 17 years as Charleston Heights Arts Center Coordinator for the City of Las Vegas.

She is a member of Friends of St. Pete Beach Library Board; an appointed member of the City of St. Pete Beach General Employees Pension Board’ member of the Community Advisory Committee Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Active member of Tampa Bay Watch, a non-profit organization “working to preserve the delicate ecological balance that exists in Tampa Bay.” She recently retired from her job as a First Grade teacher in the Pinellas County school district.

She recently ran for City of St. Pete District 2 City Commissioner and received 48 percent of the vote.

This is her fourth contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
October 2, 2015

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“Saint Joan”
Photograph by Jon Winet
St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church 315 South Casino Center Blvd.

Joan of Arc (French: Jeanne d’Arc, IPA: c. 1412 – 30 May 1431), nicknamed “The Maid of Orléans” is considered a heroine of France for her role during the Hundred Years’ War, and was canonized as a Roman Catholic saint. Joan of Arc was born to a peasant family, at Domrémy in north-east France. Joan said she received visions of the Archangel Michael, Saint Margaret, and Saint Catherine instructing her to support Charles VII and recover France from English domination. The uncrowned King Charles VII sent Joan to the siege of Orléans as part of a relief mission. She gained prominence after the siege was lifted in only nine days. Several additional swift victories led to Charles VII’s coronation at Reims. This long-awaited event boosted French morale and paved the way for the final French victory.

On 23 May 1430, she was captured at Compiègne by the Burgundian faction which was allied with the English. She was later handed over to the English, and then put on trial by the pro-English Bishop of Beauvais Pierre Cauchon on a variety of charges. After Cauchon declared her guilty she was burned at the stake on 30 May 1431, dying at about nineteen years of age.

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet includes Carl Theodor Dreyer’s 1928 masterpiece “The Passion of Joan of Arc” on his list of favorite films.

• • •
October 1, 2015

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“Live It Up”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Life is Beautiful 2015

Latest in the Daily Frame’s occasional contributions to a short term memory #tbt project.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner, hardworking musician and radio personality made a cameo appearance at the Festival.

• • •
September 30, 2015

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“Palms | Mystery Building”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

NB: We’ve reached out to the photographer for additional information. Stay tuned!

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner works all the angles.
September 29, 2015

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“Free Parking”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 15, 2015

El Cortez. Downtown Las Vegas. 7th & Ogden

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet is an excellent passenger.

• • •
September 28, 2015

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“The Moon is Beautiful”
Photograph by JOn Miller
September 26, 2015

2015 Life Is Beautiful Festival

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
September 27, 2015

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“Lil Art Bodega at Life Is Beautiful (detail)”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Lil Art Bodega

Life Is Beautiful Artist Lineup

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
September 26, 2015

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“Main Street Stratosphere at Dusk”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

The Stratosphere may well be “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner‘s favorite landmark.

• • •
September 25, 2015

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“T3-31 No Parking”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 10, 2015

McCarran International Airport

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet needs to work on his carbon footprint.*

* From Wikipedia: “A carbon footprint is historically defined as “the total sets of greenhouse gas emissions caused by an organization, event, product or individual.”

• • •
September 24, 2015

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“Life Is Beautiful Prep”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

2014 Life is Beautiful mural in the background by artist Zio Ziegler.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
September 23, 2015

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“Forever”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 14, 2015

2014 Life is Beautiful mural in the foreground by D*Face

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet is a fan of the El Cortez parking garage.

• • •
September 22, 2015

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“Saul Williams”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
The Bunkhouse Series at the Sayers Club SLS
September 21, 2015

Saul Stacey Williams (born February 29, 1972) is an American rapper, singer, songwriter, musician, poet, writer, and actor. He is known for his blend of poetry and alternative hip hop, and for his lead roles in the 1998 film Slam and Holler If Ya Hear Me, a Broadway musical featuring music by Tupac Shakur.”

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was in the house last – and most nights.

• • •
September 21, 2015

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“Grand Skyway”
Photograph by Jon Winet
Downtown Grand

Text adapted from Wikipedia:

In an urban setting, a skyway, catwalk, skybridge, or skywalk is a type of pedway consisting of an enclosed or covered bridge between two or more buildings. This protects pedestrians from the weather. Skyways are usually owned by businesses, and are therefore not public spaces, as compared with sidewalks.

Skyways usually connect on the first few floors above the ground-level floor, though they are sometimes much higher. Examples of the latter include the spectacular Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. and Kingdom Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

The world’s largest discontinuous skyway network – Calgary, Alberta, Canada’s “+15 Walkway” system – has a total length of 11 miles. The Minneapolis Skyway System is the world’s largest continuous system and spans 8 miles connecting 69 blocks in downtown Minneapolis.

Jon Winet occasionally directs “Our Las Vegas” from the Grand Tower of the Downtown Grand.

• • •
September 20, 2015

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“Open Lot”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” series.

“I wish that all of nature’s magnificence, the emotion of the land, the living energy of place could be photographed.”

Annie Leibovitz

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner celebrates the energy of place.

• • •
September 19, 2015

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“Wynn Las Vegas”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-by” Series.

Steve Wynn first revealed plans of a 49-story, 2,455-room, and 514-foot resort and four-acre lake in August 2001. The project did not have a formal name and would be built on the site of the Desert Inn. The project’s name was revealed on October 19, 2001, as “Le Rêve”, meaning “the dream” in French.

To make way for the resort, the Desert Inn’s main tower was imploded on October 23, 2001. The rest of the Desert Inn was imploded on November 17, 2004. The project included the redesigning of the historic Desert Inn golf course, which was renamed the Wynn Golf Club. The remainder of the property was acquired by purchasing private residences that were generally located along Paradise Avenue. While some owners sold early on, others held out. This resulted in numerous legal actions between the various parties. In the end, the site acquired totaled 215 acres.

In June 2002, Steve Wynn filed for an IPO to help fund the project. Wynn hired Marnell Corrao Associates to design and build the resort. The resort was built at a cost of $2.7 billion, which made it the largest privately funded construction project in the nation. The name of the resort was changed from “Le Rêve” to “Wynn Las Vegas” on June 23, 2003.

Wynn Las Vegas opened on April 28, 2005, the same day as Steve Wynn’s wife, Elaine’s birthday, the 55th anniversary of the original Desert Inn opening, and five years from the day Wynn purchased the Desert Inn site. Early advertising for the resort featured exterior images of the hotel tower, with Wynn standing on the roof, just above his signature logo.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps her eyes on the road while scanning the landscape for photo ops.

• • •
September 18, 2015

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“Bali Hai”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“Designed by Lee Schmidt and Brian Curley in 2000, the Bali Hai Golf Club is a worthy namesake of the famous Indonesian land of enchantment. The lush surroundings include seven-acres of opulent water features, a total of 4,000 trees with 2,500 stands of towering palms and 100,000 Balinese tropical plants. Transition and out-of-play areas are accented with Augusta white sand and black volcanic rock outcroppings.

The par-71 course measures 7,002 yards from the tips and affords spectacular views of the Strip mega-resorts from the fairways. Bali Hai’s unique layout includes teasers like #16, a par-3 island green that frequently comes with an audience from the Cili Restaurant patio and #3, a 468 yard par-4 with a creek running the entire right-side, balanced with a bunker on the left. Play #3 and find out why it’s called “Shipwreck.” Challenging play, breathtaking scenery and first class facilities make Bali Hai a one-of-a-kind golfer’s paradise that Golf Digest named one of the “Top 50 Resort Courses”.

The course was designed to go in like a lamb and out like a lion, meaning that the drama and thrills build as player progress along the course.

‘We want to give guests an opportunity to loosen up and enjoy their surroundings before we begin challenging their skills,’ said Brian Curley. ‘This will be a fun course … you’ll know you’ve been tested, but it won’t beat you to death. It’s the kind of golf course you could play day after day and never tire of its charm.'”

Text from club website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
September 17, 2015

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“Downtown Tree”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 13, 2015

“In botany, a tree is a perennial plant with an elongated stem, or trunk, supporting branches and leaves in most species. In some usages, the definition of a tree may be narrower, including only woody plants with secondary growth, plants that are usable as lumber or plants above a specified height. Trees are not a taxonomic group but include a variety of plant species that have independently evolved a woody trunk and branches as a way to tower above other plants to compete for sunlight. In looser senses, the taller palms, the tree ferns, bananas and bamboos are also trees. Trees tend to be long-lived, some reaching several thousand years old. The tallest known tree, a coast redwood named Hyperion, stands 379 ft high. Trees have been in existence for 370 million years. It is estimated that there are just over 3 trillion mature trees in the world.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas,” a cultural animation project launched in 2012.

• • •
September 16, 2015

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“Western Hotel”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré

“The Western Hotel and Casino was a hotel and casino in downtown Las Vegas, Nevada. The 8,925 sq ft casino was owned by the Barrick Gaming and operated by Navegante and The Tamares Group.

The Western was the lowest rung of Jackie Gaughan’s low-roller casino empire that included the Las Vegas Club, The Plaza, the Gold Spike and El Cortez.

The Western opened in 1970 as the Western Hotel & Bingo Parlor and was owned by Jackie Gaughan and Mel Exber. At its opening, The Western was the world’s largest bingo parlor with 1,020 seats.

Jackie Gaughan sold the hotel to Barrick Gaming in March 2004. The plans called for redeveloping the Western Hotel as a Latino destination resort. At the time, the AP said about the property, ‘On a stretch of despair that tourists in Las Vegas seldom see, the Western Hotel-Casino stands out as a beacon for the broke and nearly broken.’

In 2005, The Tamares Group acquired total control of the hotel and casino through a lease from Barrick. In 2010 the hotel portion completely closed and redevelopment still remains uncertain to this day.

On November 15, 2011, the Tamares Group announced that ‘due to decreased demand at this location,’ The Western would close on January 16, 2012. Its future redevelopment is uncertain.

In March 2013, the property was purchased for $14 million by a company affiliated with Tony Hsieh’s Downtown Project, a campaign to revitalize the Fremont Street area.”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré

Text from Wikipedia.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
September 16, 2015

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“Mattresses with Cadillac Fin – Four Queens Garage”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 14, 2015

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas,” a cultural animation project launched in 2012.

• • •
September 14, 2015

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“City Center from Under the Pedestrian Bridge”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“DISCOVER A 360° LIFESTYLE AT THE LANDMARK VEER TOWERS — EXQUISITE CONDOMINIUMS IN THE HEART OF CITYCENTER, LAS VEGAS’ ULTIMATE DESTINATION FOR DINING, GAMING, SHOPPING & ENTERTAINMENT. INCOMPARABLE AMENITIES AND AN UNBEATABLE LOCATION COME TOGETHER FOR AN ENVIABLE LIFESTYLE THAT TAKES LUXURY IN AN EXCITING NEW DIRECTION. THIS IS YOUR EXCLUSIVE OPPORTUNITY TO OWN AN EXTRAORDINARY HOME IN THE CENTER OF IT ALL. SOME CHOOSE TO FOLLOW. OTHERS ARE BORN TO VEER.”

Text in all caps from Veer Towers website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas is an artist and native of Las Vegas. She has been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening. She is also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner. Her work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room.

• • •
September 13, 2015

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“Colorado River view from Laughlin”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“The Colorado River supplies water for 30 million people. It is one of the most contested, recreated-upon, and carefully controlled rivers on Earth. Diverted under peaks, utilized by turbines that create hydropower, and stored by enormous reservoirs, the 1,450-mile-long Colorado faces growing challenges associated with increasing population, declining ecosystems, drought, and expected climate change.”

Text from National Geographic site.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner ocasionally gets on the road and out of town.

• • •
September 12, 2015

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SE Corner – Twain & Swenson
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

For future research purposes: March 2015 Google Street View.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner doesn’t miss much.

• • •
September 11, 2015

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“Terminal 3 – Detail (Passenger Pickup)”
Photograph by Jon Winet
September 10, 2015

“Terminal 3 (T3) at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas, Nevada, US, was opened in June 2012. The 1.9 million square feet terminal was built at a cost of $2.4bn, which was funded by Clark County Department of Aviation.”

“T3 was designed by PGAL in collaboration with Welles Pugsley Architects. Perini Building acted as the general contractor for the construction, with a contract value of $1.2bn. Bechtel Infrastructure was the construction manager and Walter P. Moore the consultant engineer.”

Text from airport-technology.com.

Jon Winet is the director of “Our Las Vegas.”

• • •
September 10, 2015

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“View from the Bandstand”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is preparing for many Okotoberfest performances.

• • •

September 8, 2015

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“6th & Clark – Lloyd D. George U.S. Courthouse and Federal Building – View from the South East”
Photograph by Justin McAffee

“Seeking to create and preserve a legacy of outstanding public buildings, the General Services Administration set forth key design efforts around the country which included the Lloyd D. George Courthouse in Las Vegas. The courthouse, a testament to justice, establishes a powerful design precedent for large-scale public buildings.”

Text from CannonDesign website.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
September 7, 2015

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“Funkathon, with Sean Sloan and Tony Wells”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

From Saturday’s show FUNKATHON: Jimi Jackpot & The Hot Slots, Constant Moving Party, Home Cookin’, Herd Of Lemmings, V.A. at Backstage Bar & Billiards

With a shout-out on Labor Day to all musicians who work on our experiential, acoustic behalf.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner works and walks the basss.
September 6, 2015

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“El Travatore”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Route 66

From the “Drive-by” Series.

“When you are searching for themed hotel rooms among route 66 motels, El Trovatore Motel, is one of the few pre-World War II Kingman Arizona motels that are still standing. When taking a trip on Route 66, motels are among the attractions people want to experience. This historic route 66 motel started in 1937 as a service station, with the tourist court added later in 1939, and was first owned by John F. Miller. This motel with hollywood themed rooms is located on El Trovatore Hill, in Kingman, Arizona, a location on a stony bluff that awards stunning vistas of the Hualapai Mountains and the awe inspiring landscapes that embrace it.”

Text from Motel website.

Note that the site links to the music video for the motel’s official song.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a member of Killian’s Angels. They will likely not be covering El Trovatore’s official song.

• • •
September 5, 2015

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“Osaka Liberty”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

4205 West Sahara Ave
May 2015 Google Street View

Osaka was the first of Las Vegas’ Japanese restaurants established in 1967. Now with two locations, West Sahara and Henderson, it has withstood the test of time and is currently operated by the second generation of the Nakanishi family. Osaka has built its reputation in carrying only the finest in fresh fish and its ability to create a variety of rolls which satisfy even the most adventurous of tastes. The restaurant also boasts carrying the most variety of fish of any sushi bar in town. Currently, we are carrying exotics that are usually found only in Japan such as aoyagi (live surf clams), awabi (live abalone), sayori (halfbeak), katsuo (bonita), kanpachi (rudderfish), and Blue Fin Toro.”

Text from restaurant website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner will have the Hiyayakko and a Hamachi Roll.

• • •<
September 4, 2015

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“Sixth and Fremont Fire | Mural | Ogden”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“Las Vegas Fire & Rescue is an I.S.O. Class One fire department as well as an accredited agency by the Commission on Fire Accreditation International. The department provides all fire suppression, prevention and education programs in the city as well as paramedic emergency medical services to the residents and visitors of the Las Vegas community. In addition, the department also has a Bomb Squad, Hazardous Materials Team and Technical Rescue Team that provides services for the city as well as the rest of Clark County.”

Text from City website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner appreciates a good visual collision.

• • •
September 3, 2015

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“Downtown Hotel”
Photograph by Aimee Riley McAffee

Aimee Riley McAffee was born in Honolulu, Hawai’i, grew up in the suburbs of Dallas, Texas, then matured in San Jose, California before arriving in Las Vegas 11 years ago. She is the Editor-in-Chief of adventurenevada.com and recently starting writing as a guest contributor to Las Vegas Food and Beverage Professional Magazine.

• • •
September 2, 2015

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“Motel”
Photograph by JOn Miller

13th and Fremont Street East May 2015 Google Street View

A motel is a hotel designed for motorists and usually has a parking area for motor vehicles. Entering dictionaries after World War II, the word motel, coined as a portmanteau contraction of “motor hotel”, originates from the Milestone Mo-Tel of San Luis Obispo, California (now called the Motel Inn of San Luis Obispo), which was built in 1925. The term referred initially to a type of hotel consisting of a single building of connected rooms whose doors faced a parking lot and in some circumstances, a common area or a series of small cabins with common parking. Motels are often individually owned, though motel chains do exist.

As large highway systems began to be developed in the 1920s, long-distance road journeys became more common, and the need for inexpensive, easily accessible overnight accommodation sites close to the main routes led to the growth of the motel concept Motels peaked in popularity in the 1960s with rising car travel, only to decline in response to competition from the newer chain hotels that became commonplace at highway interchanges as traffic was bypassed onto newly constructed freeways. Several historic motels are listed on the US National Register of Historic Places.”
Text from wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
September 1, 2015

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“Inspire”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“Located at one of the most famous intersections in the world, INSPIRE is a one-of-a-kind community and event complex over a decade in the making—not to mention a bold step towards a brighter, more enriching and entertaining downtown.

Intimate yet surprisingly expansive, its heart is the state-of-the-art Inspire Theater. Designed to accommodate a wide variety of dynamic, idea-driven speaking and performance events, it’s perfect for private parties, small-scale productions, screenings and other special or corporate events.”

Text from SEM website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
August 31, 2015

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“Neon Moon”
Photograph by JOn Miller
August 29, 2015

“Tonight the world has been able to observe a spectacular celestial phenomenon – the supermoon, also known as the Sturgeon Moon. It is the first of three consecutive “supermoons” occurring this year.

In fact, the term ‘supermoon’ is not astronomical. Scientists call this event a ‘perigee moon’: it takes place when the full Moon reaches the closest point to Earth on its oval orbit. This point is called perigee and it is about 50,000 km closer to our planet than the opposite side of the Moon’s elliptical path – apogee.”

Text from “Sturgeon Moon 2015 rises: Stunning supermoon lights up Saturday night sky.”

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
August 30, 2015

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“Cook Bank Building”
Photograph by Justin McAffee
Rhyolite, Nevada.

“Rhyolite is a ghost town in Nye County, in the U.S. state of Nevada. It is in the Bullfrog Hills, about 120 miles northwest of Las Vegas, near the eastern edge of Death Valley. The town began in early 1905 as one of several mining camps that sprang up after a prospecting discovery in the surrounding hills. During an ensuing gold rush, thousands of gold-seekers, developers, miners and service providers flocked to the Bullfrog Mining District. Many settled in Rhyolite, which lay in a sheltered desert basin near the region’s biggest producer, the Montgomery Shoshone Mine.

Industrialist Charles M. Schwab bought the Montgomery Shoshone Mine in 1906 and invested heavily in infrastructure, including piped water, electric lines and railroad transportation, that served the town as well as the mine. By 1907, Rhyolite had electric lights, water mains, telephones, newspapers, a hospital, a school, an opera house, and a stock exchange. Published estimates of the town’s peak population vary widely, but scholarly sources generally place it in a range between 3,500 and 5,000 in 1907–08.

Rhyolite declined almost as rapidly as it rose. After the richest ore was exhausted, production fell. The 1906 San Francisco earthquake and the financial panic of 1907 made it more difficult to raise development capital. In 1908, investors in the Montgomery Shoshone Mine, concerned that it was overvalued, ordered an independent study. When the study’s findings proved unfavorable, the company’s stock value crashed, further restricting funding. By the end of 1910, the mine was operating at a loss, and it closed in 1911. By this time, many out-of-work miners had moved elsewhere, and Rhyolite’s population dropped well below 1,000. By 1920, it was close to zero.

After 1920, Rhyolite and its ruins became a tourist attraction and a setting for motion pictures. Most of its buildings crumbled, were salvaged for building materials, or were moved to nearby Beatty or other towns, although the railway depot and a house made chiefly of empty bottles were repaired and preserved. From 1988 to 1998, three companies operated a profitable open-pit mine at the base of Ladd Mountain, about 1 mile south of Rhyolite. The Goldwell Open Air Museum lies on private property just south of the ghost town, which is on property overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
August 29, 2015

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“Omnia Chandelier”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Omnia Las Vegas | Caesars Palace

“Inspired by European concert halls, the Hakkasan Group’s OMNIA nightclub, located in the former PURE Nightclub space at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, merges opulent design embedded with state-of-the-art technology to create an immersive, sensory, ever-changing experience.”

“Our goal was to recreate that special feeling of sitting in an opera box, but transform it for a nightclub.”

— Shawn Sullivan, Rockwell Group Partner

Text from Rockwell Group website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner attended the Las Vegas Weekly’s Best Of party at the Omni.

• • •
August 28, 2015

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“Bar Cocktails”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Atomic Liquors

“A drinking establishment is a business whose primary function is the serving of alcoholic beverages for consumption on the premises.

Types of bars range from seedy bars or nightclubs, sometimes termed “dive bars”, to elegant places of entertainment for the elite. Many bars have a happy hour to encourage off-peak patronage. Bars that fill to capacity sometimes implement a cover charge during their peak hours. Such bars often feature entertainment, which may be a live band or a popular disc jockey. Bars provide stools or chairs that are placed at tables or counters for their patrons. Some bars have entertainment on a stage, such as a live band, comedians, go-go dancers, or strippers.

The term “bar” is derived from the specialized counter on which drinks are served. The “back bar” is a set of shelves of glasses and bottles behind that counter. In some establishments, the back bar is elaborately decorated with woodwork, etched glass, mirrors, and lights.”

Text excerpted from Wikipedia entry for “drinking establishment.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner enjoys a good cocktail.

• • •
August 27, 2015

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“Backyard Moon”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner and her cat Lucy Furr have been known to hang out in their backyard late at night.

• • •
August 26, 2015

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“Bocce Sky no. 2”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

Learn more about the thriving Las Vegas Bocce scene. Visit the Italian American Social Club website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a serious Bocce player.

• • •
August 25, 2015

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“First 200 (Tropicana)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-by” Series.

“In 1955, Ben Jaffe, an executive of the Fontainebleau Miami Beach, came to Las Vegas and bought a 40-acre parcel at the corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and Bond Road (now Tropicana Avenue). Jaffe aimed to build the finest hotel in Las Vegas, featuring a Cuban ambience, with four room themes for guests to choose from: French Provincial, Far East, Italian Renaissance, and Drexel.

Construction ran over schedule and over budget, due in part to competition for labor with the under-construction Stardust down the road. Jaffe had to sell his interest in the Fontainebleau to complete the project, which finally opened in April 1957.

Jaffe first leased the property to his associate, Phil Kastel. The Gaming Control Board raised suspicions over Kastel’s links to organized crime, which were confirmed in May when a note bearing a Tropicana earnings figure was found in the possession of mobster Frank Costello. Jaffe next turned to J. Kell Housells, owner of the Las Vegas Club. By 1959, Housells bought out Jaffe’s interest, gaining a majority share in the Tropicana.

In the 1960s, the Tropicana fared poorly from competition with larger hotels like Caesars Palace and the Las Vegas Hilton.Houssels sold out in 1968 to Trans-Texas Airways. Deil Gustafson took control in 1971, but sold a 51% share to chemical heiress Mitzi Stauffer Briggs in 1975. Briggs began construction of the 22-floor Tiffany Tower in 1977.

A skimming operation by Kansas City organized crime members was discovered, and the owners were forced to sell out. Ramada Inns, Inc. bought the Tropicana in December 1979.

A 21-story Island Tower was constructed in 1986.

Ramada spun off its gaming properties, including the Tropicana, in 1989 as Aztar Corporation. Aztar was acquired by Columbia Sussex in January 2007, but Columbia’s gaming businesses went into bankruptcy in May 2008.

The Tropicana, which had a $440 million secured loan against it, was bought from the bankrupt company in July 2009 by its creditors, led by Canadian private equity firm Onex Corporation and former MGM Mirage CEO Alex Yemenidjian, who took over as CEO.

The remainder of Columbia Sussex’s gaming arm, reorganized under new ownership as Tropicana Entertainment Inc., promptly sued the Las Vegas property, demanding royalties for use of the Tropicana name. The case was settled in August 2011, with the Tropicana Las Vegas receiving exclusive rights to use the name in the Las Vegas region, royalty-free.

In April 2015, Penn National Gaming agreed to purchase the Tropicana for $360 million.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Update from Globest.com
August 24, 2015 12:57pm ET
“Tropicana Acquisition Gains Nevada Gaming Board Approval”
By David Phillips

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner has a vaguely Cuban ambience.

• • •

August 13 – 25, 2015 Daily Frames soon to be added. Thanks for your patience.

• • •
August 12, 2015

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“Bella and Alice”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the Las Vegas Pets series.

Bella and Alice belong to Dena Massaro Williams and Tyler Williams, two professional musicians in Las Vegas. Sometimes they hang out with “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner.

• • •
August 11, 2015

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“Golden Gate”
Photograph by Aimee Riley McAffee

Aimee Riley McAffee was born in Honolulu, Hawai’i, grew up in the suburbs of Dallas, Texas, then matured in San Jose, California before arriving in Las Vegas 11 years ago. She is the Editor-in-Chief of adventurenevada.com and recently starting writing as a guest contributor to Las Vegas Food and Beverage Professional Magazine.

She notes: “I’m a foodie, love good music, and enjoy the arts. I enjoy immersing myself in new and different things and look forward to the next chapters in my life.”

This is her first contribution to The Daily Frame

• • •
August 10, 2015

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“The Palms”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“The Palms project was first developed by the Maloof family in July 1999, during the Fiesta Casino expansion. The casino resort broke ground in July 2000. The project was officially announced by George Maloof on October 24, 2000. Construction was completed on September 26, 2001.

The Palms opened on November 15, 2001, to a massive crowd of people. Multiple celebrities attended the grand opening, such as Dennis Rodman, Pamela Anderson, Paris Hilton, and Samuel L. Jackson.

In 2002, it was the resort where participants of MTV’s The Real World: Las Vegas stayed. The level they rebuilt to accommodate MTV is now the “Real World Suite”.

On October 27, 2005, the second tower, named the “Fantasy Tower”, opened at a cost of $600 million. In keeping with George Maloof’s basketball interest (the Maloofs were majority owners of the NBA’s Sacramento Kings), the Fantasy Tower includes a two-story, 10,000 sq ft (930 m2) suite that includes the only basketball court in a hotel suite. The suite includes a locker room, scoreboard, and multi-screen entertainment system. Some of the other fantasy rooms include the G suite, the Barbie suite, and the King Pin suite.

The Palms hit financial trouble in 2010, when it started missing loan payments. Under an agreement reached with creditors TPG Capital and Leonard Green & Partners, they each received a 49% stake in the property in November 2011, in exchange for erasing about $400 million in debt. The Maloof family retains a 2% share, with options to buy back up to 20%, and George Maloof continues to manage the property.”

Text from Wikipedia.x

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner knows her local history.

• • •
August 9, 2015

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“Harrah’s”
Photograph by Justin McAffee

Harrah’s Las Vegas is a hotel and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada. It is owned and operated by Caesars Entertainment Corporation. Harrah’s has over 1,200 slot machines.

The hotel offers 2,677 rooms with an attached casino providing 90,637 sq ft of space. The hotel consists of several towers, the tallest of which has 35 stories.

There is a Las Vegas Monorail stop, the Harrah’s / The Linq station, at the rear of the property and a shuttle to the Caesars Entertainment Corp.-owned Rio.

Prior to the development that became Harrah’s, this property contained Tumbleweed Motel (1949) and Pyramids Motel (1950s).

In 1971, Holiday Inn opened the River Queen Casino in front of its new hotel on the former site of the Tumbleweed Motel. Shelby and Claudine Williams, former owners of the Silver Slipper, took over the casino in 1973. Homer Rissman, Holiday Inn’s house-architect, designed the riverboat themed casino which the Williams renamed the Holiday Casino.[3] Pyramids Motel was then demolished, becoming a parking area for the hotel and casino.

Holiday Inn bought a 40% share of the casino’s parent company, Riverboat Inc. in 1979,[4] and bought out the remaining 60% in 1983. Holiday Inn’s subsidiary, Harrah’s, took over its management with Claudine Williams as Chairwoman.

A second tower was added to the hotel in the early 1980s, making it the largest in the Holiday Inn chain, with over 1000 rooms.

In April 1992, Harrah’s Entertainment, no longer a subsidiary of Holiday Inn, renamed the property Harrah’s Las Vegas, the first hotel in Las Vegas to carry the name of William F. Harrah. When Harrah’s built its third tower, designed by Martin Stern, the riverboat was demolished and the hotel remodeled with a carnival theme.

Text from Wikipedia.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
August 8, 2015

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“El Cortez Noir”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner appreciates a dramatic sky.

• • •
August 7, 2015

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“Buffalo – Main Street Looking North”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Second of August 6-7, 2015 two-part series.

As noted yesterday: “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner looks in all directions.

• • •
August 6, 2015

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“Too Much Awesome – Main Street Looking South.”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner looks in all directions.

• • •
August 5, 2015

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“Clark County Government Center”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“Designed by renowned architects Fentress Bradburn and opened in 1995, the Government Center’s sandstone exterior reflects Nevada’s historical ecology, while images of ancient petroglyphs imbedded in interior and exterior walls pay homage to its cultural heritage. The 385,000-square-foot facility stretches across 38.8 acres of land located on the southeast corner of Grand Central Parkway and Bonneville Avenue. The forms and materials of the building blend seamlessly to tie it to the local environment, particularly Red Rock Canyon, the Valley of Fire, and other natural sandstone formations representative of Clark County.”

Text from County website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a one-person NGO.

• • •
August 4, 2015

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“Carpets Galore (Downtown Empty Lot)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner roams the streets of Las Vegas in search of the imaginary.

• • •
August 3, 2015

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“Blue Moon”
Photograph by JOn Miller
July 31, 2010. Whitney Mesa, Henderson.

“At the time Earth formed 4.5 billion years ago, other smaller planetary bodies were also growing. One of these hit earth late in Earth’s growth process, blowing out rocky debris. A fraction of that debris went into orbit around the Earth and aggregated into the moon.

Two Planetary Science Institute (PSI) senior scientists, Dr. William K. Hartmann and Dr. Donald R. Davis, were the first to suggest the leading modern hypothesis of the moon’s origin, in a paper published in 1975 in the journal Icarus.”

Text from PSI website.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
August 2, 2015

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“Whitney Mesa (waiting on a Blue Moon)”
Photograph by JOn Miller
July 31, 2010

“A blue moon is an additional full moon that appears in a subdivision of a year: either the third of four full moons in a season, or a second full moon in a month of the common calendar.

The phrase has nothing to do with the actual color of the moon, although a literal “blue moon” (the moon appearing with a tinge of blue) may occur in certain atmospheric conditions: e.g., when there are volcanic eruptions or when exceptionally large fires leave particles in the atmosphere.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
August 1, 2015

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“110 N 13th St”
Photograph by JOn Miller

The photographer notes: “The Sunset Peter Pan Motel was shot from my humble abode when I lived on E Fremont Street. I loved the way that sign popped at dusk, I loved that that was my view everytime I stepped out the door.”

MORE
Google Street Views:

May 2015
April 2009

Backstory:
July 2, 2013 Las Vegas Review Journal story by Richard Lake
“Tony Hsieh expands property portfolio with Peter Pan purchase”

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

Stay tuned for a future shot of last night’s Blue Moon.

• • •

updated in the early morning (usually)
July 31, 2015

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“Atomic”
Atomic Liquors
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“It began innocently enough. In 1938, two German chemists accidentally discovered how to split the nucleus of the uranium atom: nuclear fission. Einstein’s E=mc2 equation predicted that the amount of energy released from just one atom would be enormous.

Physicists all over the world immediately realized that fission might make a bomb of extraordinary power — and that Nazi Germany might be capable of creating one. The fear of Adolph Hitler getting a nuclear weapon led to a race to deter him by developing such a bomb first. Thus began a chain of events that would lead inexorably to Hiroshima, the nuclear arms race, the hydrogen bomb, the Cuban Missile Crisis and some of the greatest fear and tension ever in world history.”

From PBS website for “The Bomb,” premiered July 28, 2015 – and now available in its entirety online.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is radiant.

• • •
July 30, 2015

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“Cosmopolitan Fire”
Photograph by Diana Perez
July 25, 2015
From the “Drive-By Series”

As reported by the U.K.’s Daily Mail on July 25:

“Two people were injured and hundreds of others were forced to flee after a fire broke out at a luxury hotel in Las Vegas on Saturday afternoon.

The blaze started at an outside pool area on a 14th-floor deck of The Cosmopolitan and quickly spread, setting pool cabanas and trees alight.

As large plumes of black smoke billowed into the sky, terrified guests fled to safety and more than 100 firefighters rushed to the scene.

One person injured in the blaze was taken to hospital, while a second guest with minor injuries is still being evaluated at the 2,995-room hotel.

The pair both suffered smoke inhalation, officials said.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze around 30 minutes after arriving at the scene, Fire Chief Greg Cassell told KSNV. An investigation is ongoing.

Diana Perez, 32, was born and raised in Las Vegas. She is a senior at the UNLV, pursuing a career in Broadcast Journalism. She works at the Clark County School District Department of Adult Education as an ELL (English Language Learners) Coordinator Assistant.

Diana is an alumna of Mary Hausch‘s advanced classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
July 29, 2015

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“Kahlua”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
From the “Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series”

The photographer notes: “Kahlua is a 10 year-old Lhasa Apso who has been part of our family since she was a puppy. When our other Lhasa (Pudgie) was entering her senior years, becoming inactive and somewhat lethargic, we decided she needed a friend. Kahlua to the rescue!!!

Kahlua loves her morning sunbaths, tug-o-war rope toys, raw veggies, belly rubs, and playtime with her forever companion, Foxy!”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
July 28, 2015
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“Onnia”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
July 21, 2015

The photographer explains: “Omnia, the club at Caesars, doing its best Deep Space 9 impression, from the Las Vegas Weekly “Best of” party.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner enjoys a good party.

• • •
July 27, 2015
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“Larkin Plumbing”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

1801 S. Industrial Road.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is industrious.

• •
July 26, 2015

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“Smile”
Kelso, California. March 15, 2015.
Photograph by JOn Miller

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

He and fellow photographer Andrea Lipmomi have also been known make forays into the surrounding landscape.

• • •
July 25, 2015

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“Western Bingo”
Photograph by Courtney Carroll

Courtney Carroll notes: “I’m a Las Vegas native and I’ve been residing in the lovely Huntridge neighborhood for the last 6 years. Some might say my claim to fame is playing drums for a few Las Vegas bands; The Clydesdale, Kid Meets Cougar, Dusty Sunshine, Thee Swank Bastards, and Love Pentagon (among others). I spend my wonderful work day at one of the coolest places in Las Vegas, the Neon Museum.”

This is her first contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
July 24, 2015

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“Bus”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi

“Hop on one of our Lucky Streak buses and we’ll provide quality service to downtown Las Vegas. Besides ease and affordability, you’ll find that Greyhound gives you more freedom as well. That’s because our round-trip fares are open-ended, which allows you to return home at any time.

From the downtown Las Vegas terminal you can choose to hit any and all of the famous Las Vegas casinos. So pack your lucky shirt and head to Las Vegas in style.”

Text from Greyhound website.

Google Street View

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is an alumna of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY; and the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas. You couldn’t ask for a better neighbor.

• • •
July 23, 2015

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“Hard Rock Exterior”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré

Hard Rock Hotel & Casino is a premier entertainment destination resort in Las Vegas, owned by Brookfield Asset Management and managed by Warner Hospitality. Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Las Vegas offers an energetic entertainment and gaming experience with the services and amenities associated with a boutique luxury resort hotel. Features of the property include three hotel towers with 1,506 guest rooms & suites, eight spa villas and seven penthouse suites; 75,000 square feet of casino space; 155,000 square feet of flexible meeting and convention space; the world-famous Joint Music Hall; 2 night clubs, 30,000 square feet of spa & salon, 70,000 square feet of restaurants and bars, and 8,000 square feet of retail space.”

Text from Warner Hospitality website.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
July 22, 2015

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“Escape”
Photograph of and by JOn Miller
July 17, 2015

Swim may refer to:

• Aquatic locomotion, the act of biologically propelled motion through a liquid medium
• Human swimming, the useful or recreational activity of movement through water
• Swimming, the competitive sport of swimming
• Swim, a fad dance”

Text from Wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
July 21, 2015

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“51s Sky”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Las Vegas Triple-A baseball, of the Pacific Coast League, has provided exciting family entertainment to the city for over three decades. Initiating professional baseball in Cashman Field, a crowd of 13,878 fans jammed the stadium on April 1, 1983, for a Major League exhibition game between the Seattle Mariners and the San Diego Padres. PCL baseball was born in Las Vegas on April 10, 1983, before a crowd of 10,622. The then-Stars, in their brown, gold and burnt orange uniforms, defeated Salt Lake City, 11-8. Las Vegas, under manager Harry Dunlop, posted a regular season 83-60 record, the team’s best mark which stood for 19 seasons until the 2002 51s broke the all-time record of 85-59 (.590). Outfielder Kevin McReynolds, the 1983 PCL MVP, set the tone for the caliber of players, which would appear yearly in the talent laden PCL. Manager Larry Bowa guided the Stars to their first PCL crown in 1986 with an 80-62 record and Steve Smith led Las Vegas to its second PCL title in 1988. The 1983 Stars team were inducted into the Southern Nevada Sports Hall of Fame on June 8, 2007.”

Text from 51s website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner has no trouble with the curve.

• • •
July 20, 2015

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“Eiffel Tower | Crescent Moon”
Photograph by JOn Miller
July 17, 2015

“The lunar phase or phase of the moon is the shape of the illuminated (sunlit) portion of the Moon as seen by an observer on Earth. The lunar phases change cyclically as the Moon orbits the Earth, according to the changing positions of the Moon and Sun relative to the Earth. The Moon and the Earth are tidally locked, therefore the same lunar surface always faces Earth. This face is variously sunlit depending on the position of the Moon in its orbit. Therefore, the portion of this hemisphere that is visible to an observer on Earth can vary from about 100% (full moon) to 0% (new moon).”

Text from Wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
July 19, 2015

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“Helicopter Furniture”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is serious about the Las Vegas skies.

• • •
July 18, 2015

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“Rock of Vegas 2015”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
July 10, 2015.

“This show is the kick-off of a 19-city international tour by Dropkick Murphys, an American-Celtic punk rock band from Quincy, Massachusetts.

Dropkick Murphys have released eight albums and sold more than four million records during the band’s nearly 20-year career.

Their signature songs include ‘Tessie,’ ‘Going Out in Style’ and ‘The State of Massachusetts.’

The band’s hit, ‘I’m Shipping Up to Boston,’ was featured in the film, ‘The Departed.'”

Text from Fremont Street Experience website

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
July 17, 2015

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“Sonic”
Photographed by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-By Series”

“The theory of sonics is a branch of continuum mechanics which describes the transmission of mechanical energy through vibrations. The birth of the theory of sonics can be considered the publication of the book A treatise on transmission of power by vibrations in 1918 by the Romanian scientist Gogu Constantinescu:

‘ONE of the fundamental problems of mechanical engineering is that of transmitting energy found in nature, after suitable transformation, to some point at which can be made available for performing useful work. The methods of transmitting power known and practised by engineers are broadly included in two classes: mechanical including hydraulic, pneumatic and wire rope methods; and electrical methods….According to the new system, energy is transmitted from one point to another, which may be at a considerable distance, by means of impressed variations of pressure or tension producing longitudinal vibrations in solid, liquid or gaseous columns. The energy is transmitted by periodic changes of pressure and volume in the longitudinal direction and may be described as wave transmission of power, or mechanical wave transmission.’
– Gogu Constantinescu

Later on the theory was expanded in electro-sonic, hydro-sonic, sonostereo-sonic and thermo-sonic. The theory was the first chapter of compressible flow applications and has stated for the first time the mathematical theory of compressible fluid, and was considered a branch of continuum mechanics.The laws discovered by Constantinescu, used in sonicity are the same with the laws used in electricity.”

Text from Wikipedia

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a fan of Sonic the Drive-in. We’re not sure how she feels about Sonic the Hedgehog.

• • •
July 16, 2015

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“Coupe de Ville”
Photographed by Glenn Elliott at the April 2015 Cadillac Through The Years show at Town Square.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
July 15, 2015

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“North Las Vegas Vista no. 7”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By Series”.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps her eye on the road and the landscape.

• • •
July 14, 2015

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“La Fête Nationale”
Photograph by Justin McAffee.
Paris, Las Vegas.

“Food, drinks, and fireworks in July may sound like an American holiday, but just ten days after America’s Independence Day, on July 14, the French also have their own red, white and blue holiday — Bastille Day. The annual celebration, known to the French as ‘La Fête Nationale’ is a nationwide holiday that commemorates the anniversary of the liberation of France marked by the storming of the Bastille.

The Anglicized term of “Bastille Day” comes from the name of a medieval prison where political prisoners were held for arbitrary reasons and had no chance of appeal at the hands of Louis XVI’s royal government, according to France’s government website. Because of this, the Bastille became a symbol of the oppressive monarchy and was the reason why it was targeted by the people of Paris when they stormed the fortress on July 14, 1789. Though there were only seven prisoners held in Bastille that day, the revolt was hugely symbolic of liberation of the French public, which continues to be a central part of France’s core ideals which are represented by its three-color flag: Liberty, Equality and Fraternity for all.

Today celebrations are a representation little more lighthearted but still carry a great deal of tradition. Thousands in Paris gather along the streets of Paris to watch the pageantry that is the Bastille Day Military Parade, which is considered to be the oldest and largest military parade in Europe, according to the Convention and Visitors Bureau of Paris. The French military make their way along Champs-Elysees from the Arc de Triomphe to the Place de la Concorde. Other popular activities including Fireman’s Ball, which are a series of parties hosted by France’s fire stations who open their doors for the day turning the city into a giant outdoor fair.

A national holiday wouldn’t be complete without a spread of traditional French food. Celebrating the holiday means eating outdoors and enjoying casual meals with friends and family during the day which can include picnic foods like quiche, fruits, vegetable and some champagne, to more traditionally French spreads of rillettes or pot au feu.

A long day of festivities is marked with a dramatic display of fireworks launched from the Eiffel Tower. The celebration of Bastille Day has spread beyond French borders and been adopted by Francophile living in the England, Canada and the United States. With the title of ‘America’s most French city,’ New Orleans often has a big Bastille Day celebration, featuring film festivals, live music and food.”

Text from International Business Times story, “Bastille Day 2015: Facts, Traditions And History Of French National Day” by Michelle FlorCruz.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
July 13, 2015

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“El Cortez Parking Ramp View of Container Park”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“The Mantis is a 40 foot long Mad Maxian creature fabricated mostly out of steel, built atop a 1983 GMC Dump Truck. She is a mobile art piece complete with stunning paint job, powerful stereo and pseudo paramilitary feel. She was made by married couple Kirk Jellum and Kristen Ulmer (founders of Mantis Entertainment) as a gift to the citizens of Black Rock City, otherwise known as Burning Man. After two years attending Burning Man, she is now owned by Tony Hsieh and will be permanently housed in downtown Las Vegas.

The Mantis is a 150 scale replica of a female Praying Mantis; a creature know both for it’s stillness and patience and for it’s predatory eeriness.

When in it’s full glory, The Mantis is 40 feet long, 30 feet wide and the top of the flame throwers stand at 55 feet high. She holds up to 30 people on her back. In this state she seems futuristic, post apocalyptic… as if she’s a PREYing Mantis creeping down the road, complete with flame shooting out her antennae. Then, once stationary and passenger-less, she rises up to full glory and turns into a PRAYing Mantis. The music choices during these alternate states aid in her feel and mystique. Her head moves in four directions with passenger input. At night her eyes become a dance of green lasers. The duel flame throwers off he antennae are the punctuation mark to this both beautiful and horrific creature.

-Built in Rockville, Utah (Flying Zions) summer of 2010 on a 1983 Diesel Dump truck bought from a farm. The truck had been sitting stationery in the weeds for over 4 years, but started right up on it’s first try.
-Idea and design by Aerospace Engineer Kirk Jellum. When he began the project spring of 2010 he was employed full time by ATK designing and building the next version of the Hubble Telescope- The James Webb Space Telescope.
-Kirks new wife of 6 months, Kristen, had built her own art car prior to their meeting- a 22 foot long 7 foot high Rat that was ridden like a horse, built on a golf cart. He decided they should build and own a new art car, one they made together. Nutshell, he simply wanted to peacock for his new wife. She was veeeery impressed.
-Once the truck was purchased and the design complete, they hired Utah metal artist Chris Coleman to help with fabrication and to make her pretty.
-Shortly after starting construction in early summer, Kirk’s aerospace contract was ended with one days notice.
-This was good because he could suddenly work on the Mantis full time.
-This was bad because not having his income made the couple take a hard look at their values.
-Kristen and Kirk decided even if they had but one year to live and were destitute- this is still what they’d do.
-The Flaming Antennae were designed and built by Kirk and fellow engineer and virgin burner, Jeremy Smith.
-Jeremy was also laid off from his job from the same company (ATK) as Kirk, half a year later.
-They were first full scale tested outside Kirk and Kristen’s home in Olympus Cove, Utah. Around a hundred 9-1-1 calls resulted.
-It took an hour of smooth talking, but the Utah Fire & Police Depts. now love the Mantis, and want to see it thrive! (Las Vegas has since approved of her fire system for public use).
-Kristen & Kirk took The Mantis to parties and events as well as taking it to Burning Man for 20 months until Tony Hsieh saw her and asked to buy her.
-There were about 20 other people involved in the project all of whom where crucial to her birth – thank you all!
-The Grass facade was build summer of 2011 with the genius of Spencer and Christian, two amazing graffiti artists based in Salt Lake.
-There are over 3000 man hours and 500 design hours in the Mantis.
-It is the project that launched Kirk out of his past aerospace job of 15 years into being the full time large scale kinetic and artist engineer he is today.

Text republished in its entirety with added links from the Mantis Entertainment website.

March 2015 Google street view

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner always takes the time to check the view from the El Cortez parking ramp.

• • •
July 12, 2015

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“McCarran Claim”
Photograph by Joanne Lentino.

Advertising

“The Department of Aviation, through its creative advertising program, offers advertisers a package of quality options at McCarran International Airport. These include digital networks in the concourses, baggage claim and the taxi line.

Reach your customers the minute they land, and while they wait for those departing flights. With earlier check-in times, airport advertising pays off like never before!

McCarran’s 42+ million annual travelers will see your message or product in the gates, while riding the trams, in baggage claim and while waiting for transportation. This dynamic program offers a wide variety of long- and short-term programs that include digital advertising, backlit spectaculars, branding campaigns, baggage claim presence and sponsorships. Advertising can target all passengers, or specific demographics.”

Text from McCarran Doing Business website.

Joanne Lentino, former Las Vegas resident, dancer and American Guild of Variety Artists organizer, served for seventeen years as 17 years as Charleston Heights Arts Center Coordinator for the City of Las Vegas.

She is a member of Friends of St. Pete Beach Library Board; an appointed member of the City of St. Pete Beach General Employees Pension Board’ member of the Community Advisory Committee Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Active member of Tampa Bay Watch, a non-profit organization “working to preserve the delicate ecological balance that exists in Tampa Bay.” She recently retired from her job as a First Grade teacher in the Pinellas County school district.

She recently ran for City of St. Pete District 2 City Commissioner and received 48 percent of the vote.

This is her third contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
July 11, 2015

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“Median | Strip | Palms”
Photograph by Joanne Lentino.

Photographed near Betty Willis‘ “Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign,” Joanne Lentino’s second contribution to the Daily Frame provides further documentary traces of her recent trip to the Radiant City.

Today’s publication of “Median | Strip | Palms” concludes our two-day observation of local arecaceae.

Joanne Lentino, former Las Vegas resident, dancer and American Guild of Variety Artists organizer, served for seventeen years as 17 years as Charleston Heights Arts Center Coordinator for the City of Las Vegas.

She is a member of Friends of St. Pete Beach Library Board; an appointed member of the City of St. Pete Beach General Employees Pension Board’ member of the Community Advisory Committee Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Active member of Tampa Bay Watch, a non-profit organization “working to preserve the delicate ecological balance that exists in Tampa Bay.” She recently retired from her job as a First Grade teacher in the Pinellas County school district.

She recently ran for City of St. Pete District 2 City Commissioner and received 48 percent of the vote.

• • •
July 10, 2015

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“Three Palms”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“Whether as shrubs, trees, or vines, palms have two methods of growth: solitary or clustered. The common representation is that of a solitary shoot ending in a crown of leaves. This monopodial character may be exhibited by prostrate, trunkless, and trunk-forming members.

Palms may instead grow in sparse though dense clusters.

Most palms grow in the tropics. They are abundant throughout the tropics, and thrive in almost every habitat therein. Their diversity is highest in wet, lowland tropical forests, especially in ecological “hotspots” such as Madagascar, which has more endemic palms than all of Africa.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is an aficionado of local flora.

• • •
July 9, 2015

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“July 6, 2015 Monsoon Sky”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

The Daily Frame participates in #tbt Throw Back Thursday only occassionally but we welcome this opportunity to showcase another stunning photograph from Monday’s extreme weather event in the Valley.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
July 8, 2015

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“The End of the Street”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

From the southwest of the Valley.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
July 7, 2015

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“Tavern (July 6 Stormy Sky)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner. July 6, 2015
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is your local aesthetic weather report.

• • •<
July 6, 2015

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“Fourth of July Sky (Leaving Town Square)”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas. July 4, 2015
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
July 5, 2015

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“Red Rock Approach”
Photograph by Joanne Lentino. Summer 2015.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to add Joanne Lentino to its roster of contributing photographers.

Joanne Lentino, former Las Vegas resident, dancer and American Guild of Variety Artists organizer, served for seventeen years as 17 years as Charleston Heights Arts Center Coordinator for the City of Las Vegas.

She is a member of Friends of St. Pete Beach Library Board; an appointed member of the City of St. Pete Beach General Employees Pension Board’ member of the Community Advisory Committee Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Active member of Tampa Bay Watch, a non-profit organization “working to preserve the delicate ecological balance that exists in Tampa Bay.” She recently retired from her job as a First Grade teacher in the Pinellas County school district.

She recently ran for City of St. Pete District 2 City Commissioner and received 48 percent of the vote.

• • •
July 4, 2015

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“El Cortez | Flag (detail)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
July 1, 2015

“Independence Day is a holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, by the Continental Congress declaring that the thirteen American colonies regarded themselves as a new nation, the United States of America, and no longer part of the British Empire.”

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is marching, tuba in hand, in today’s Summerlin Council Patriotic Parade.

• • •
July 3, 2015

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“US 95 Heading South”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Las Vegas Skies” and “Drive By Series.”
From the “Drive By Series.”

“Our Las Vegas” wishes safe travels to all planning a weekend exodus from the Radiant City.

• • •
July 2, 2015

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“ChriSTiNA I LOVE YOU”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.

“… taken in the back alley of the White Cross Shopping Center, otherwise known as The Market.”

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
July 1, 2015

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“Caesars Palace”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
Third and final image in a suite of three photographs from the “Melody Sweets’ Circus Burlesque Rehearsal Break.”
June 26, 2015

“History:

Jay Sarno made his money with a string of ‘cabana’ motels ranging from Atlanta to Palo Alto, California. His partner Nate Jacobson had a bankroll of money from a Baltimore insurance company.
In 1962, using a $10.6 million loan from Teamsters Central States Pension Fund, Sarno began building a resort on the 34-acres of property which Kirk Kerkorian owned.

Sarno was the concept and design man, the money was handled by Jacobson. Ground breaking didn’t actually start until early 1965. The Palo Alto Cabana was the virtual platform prototype for Caesars.

Sarno’s hotel was originally going to be called the Cabana Palace, then Desert Palace, then Caesars Palace, with the emblem of a chesty female dipping grapes into the waiting mouth of a recumbent Roman, fitted out in a toga, laurel wreath and phallic dagger.

Sarno thought of everything, from the Roman decor and name, to the toga-like waitress costumes, the hotel logo, the parchment-like desk stationary, matchbooks and business cards with simulated burnt edges. Sarno even had long discussions about the apostrophe in ‘Caesar’s’ – which he banished because the possessive ‘would mean that it was the place of only one Caesar’. He wanted to create the feeling that everybody in the hotel was a Caesar. ‘Caesars’ it became.

Builders hit water while building an underground parking lot. A series of coverts were built so the water was routed and building could be resumed. The underground parking plan was abandoned.

Sarno created Caesars using the usual frontage parking lot amended by a long axis of fountains marking an entry drive. The parking lots were pushed to the side for this effect.

Caesars faced the Strip with a royal presence. The wings that marked the entry were Baroque Rome. At roadside, in front of the herd of the spraying fountains stands a copy of the Winged Victory of Samothrace. The main building is set back 135 feet. The original porte cochère was a flat canopy back by a black-tiled screen, flanked by reproductions of classical soldier statues in scalloped niches.

Sarno asked for proposals from local sign companies for the sign. Young Electric Sign Company submitted an entry, which ripped a pediment, architrave, and columns off a Roman temple and placed them at right angles to the road. Originally two attraction boards laced through the four Ionic columns, later a single, bigger board and two freestanding columns for support were added.

YESCO visited a dime store and picked out a few toy soldiers for scale, they happened to be centurions. Sarno liked them so much that he insisted that full-scale, full-color figures of vestal maids and plumed centurions be added to the base of the actual sign.

At the last moment, YESCO turned down the job because clients balked at paying half the cost before beginning fabrication. Ad-Art then stepped in and did the job with no money down for $350,000. The design was essentially the same as Young’s.

Inside Caesars’ entry, a vast, low casino dominated the interior. Its shallow oval-shaped dome hovered over the gaming pit which Sarno believed was conducive to relaxation. Windowless and with a blacked-out ceiling, the casino relied on sparkling trim lights to give it shape. Around this central oval spun a welter of shops, restaurants, lounges and corridors. Others led to the sunlight, made more blinding by the dazzling white exterior. One corridor went to the 1,200 Circus Maximus, the main showroom.

On August 5, 1966, the 14-story, 700 room Caesars Palace opened with each guest being welcomed by the official greeter, a blond 40-20-37 Cleopatra. The opening included the stage production of “Rome Swings” with Andy Williams, and Phil Richards playing the Caesar character.”

Text from “History of the Caesars Palace” on the a2zlasvegas website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is camera-ready – and knows her Las Vegas history.

• • •
June 30, 2015

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“Main Street Facing South”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

Main Street is the metonym for a generic street name (and often the official name) of the primary retail street of a village, town or small city in many parts of the world. It is usually a focal point for shops and retailers in the central business district, and is most often used in reference to retailing and socializing. The street running parallel to a town’s numbered streets, before First Street, may be Main Street.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner looks both ways before crossing Main Street.

• • •
June 29, 2015

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“Caesars Columns”
Photographed by Ginger Bruner.
June 26, 2015

Second of a suite of three photographs from the “Melody Sweets’ Circus Burlesque Rehearsal Break.”

“Our Las Vegas Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is camera-ready.

• • •
June 28, 2015

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“Sahara Drive Time Sunrise”
Photographed by Ginger Bruner.
June 27, 2015
From the “Drive-By Series”.

“The Sahara (Arabic: الصحراء الكبرى‎, sa’hrāʾ al-Kubrā , ‘the Great Desert’) is the largest hot desert and third largest desert after Antarctica and the Arctic.[1] Its combined surface area of 3,600,000 square miles (—accounting for substrates such as the Libyan Desert and the Sudan region—is comparable to the respective land areas of China and the United States. The desert comprises much of the land found within North Africa, excluding the fertile coastal region situated against the Mediterranean Sea, the Atlas Mountains of the Mahgreb, and the Nile Valley of Egypt and Sudan. The Sahara stretches from the Red Sea in the east, girting the Mediterranean, to the Atlantic Ocean in the west, where the landscape gradually transitions to a coastal plain. To the south, it is delimited by the Sahel, a belt of semi-arid tropical savanna that comprises the northern region of central and western Sub-Saharan Africa.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was up all night and caught the sunrise.

• • •
June 27, 2015

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“Donny & Marie | Caesars | Absinthe”
Photographed by Ginger Bruner.
June 26, 2015

First of a suite of three photographs from the “Melody Sweets’ Circus Burlesque Rehearsal Break”

“IN HER ONE-OFF VEGAS SHOW, MELODY SWEETS BLENDS BURLESQUE AND THE CIRCUS”
Story by Pj Perez on blog.caesars.com reprinted in its entirety.

She’s known to fans of the Las Vegas show “Absinthe” as the alluring Green Fairy, one of the many colorful performers in the raunchy, hilarious, adults-only spectacle at Caesars Palace. But on June 26, Melody Sweets will be the ringmaster for her very own production beneath the big white tent outside Caesars Palace, “Big Top Circus and Burlesque.”

The one-night-only, 18-over show will celebrate the sexy side of circus with a bevy of performances from both Sweets and some of Las Vegas’ most talented artists. The varied lineup includes performers from Cirque du Soleil, “Frank Marino’s Divas Las Vegas” and, of course, “Absinthe,” with all proceeds benefiting the UNLV College of Fine Arts. Tickets are available at MelodySweets.com.

The show begins at midnight, but true to the “big top” theme, the revelry begins before the doors open, with circus-inspired antics happening in the courtyard—including face painting by artists from Skin City Body Painting. Once inside, those in attendance will be treated to a circus spectacular featuring never-before-seen acts.

“Everyone who’s involved is doing something completely new and created specifically for the show,” says Sweets.

For example, “Absinthe”’s acrobatic Duo Fevrier is creating a new routine, with new costumes, music, choreography and tricks. Burlesque performer and Miss Exotic World 2004 Dirty Martini will be doing a circus-themed ballet number, 2014 King of Burlesque Mr. Gorgeous will shoot himself out of a cannon, and cast members from “Divas Las Vegas” will be performing a group dance number.

“I’m not sure if they realize what they’ve gotten themselves into,” Sweets says.

Sweets will perform a number of songs from her 2013 debut album, “Burlesque in the Black,” as well as covers of hits from such artists as Lady Gaga and Jack White, though with an appropriately thematic twist. “We’re going to arrange and make it all circus-style,” Sweets says.

Live music for “Big Top Circus and Burlesque” is being provided by an all-star band led by musical director Eric Plante of “O by Cirque du Soleil,” including David Perrico of Pop Evolution, Steven Lee of “Donny & Marie,” Mike Benigno of “MJ Live!” and Ginger Bruner of Killian’s Angels.

Sweets is actually working with Plante and Perrico on an entire album of cover songs, tentatively titled “Covered in Sweets.” And she already has another one-off production show planned for August, although she won’t say just what will be the theme yet, but like “Big Top Circus and Burlesque” and her other shows “Wild Wild West Burlesque” and “XXXmas – A Burlesque Spectacular,” it will benefit a local nonprofit.

“I’m really lucky to have such an amazing community of artists,” Sweets says. “I get to surround myself with these amazing people. It’s inspiring.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was up all night and caught the sunrise.

• • •
June 26, 2015

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“Mary Works Covington”
Photographed with Maryo Ewell by Kelli Du Fresne, Reno, Nevada.
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

Mary Works was born and raised in the old mining ghost town of Silver City, Nevada – Population 150. She has a BA in film from the University of Southern California, and works as a freelance Assistant Editor and Sound Editor. Her credits include “Ed Wood,” “Saving Private Ryan,” and “Titanic.” In 1991 she helped organize the 25 year reunion of the Red Dog Saloon, and went on to film the events to form the core of her first feature, “The Life and Times of the Red Dog Saloon.” Her father was one of the founders of the saloon, and she grew up hearing all of the fascinating stories. Mary says, “I figured I could travel all over the west for 2 years and gather stories, putting them together for a book, or a film, or even use them as research for a wild western screenplay. Or… I could get everybody in one place and hope that the magic that occurred between them would happen again, and I could capture it on film.”

Editor’s Note: Today is Mary’s last day as Nevada Arts Council Community Arts Development Program Coordinator. In recognition of her service to the State, “Our Las Vegas” is delighted to name her as an honorary “Las Vegas Creative.”

Kelli Du Fresne is a recent addition to the Nevada Arts Council Community Arts Development Program team. She is a native Nevadan and was raised in Gold Hill and Virginia City. Kelli has degrees in journalism and landscape architecture, and has interned for the Nevada Museum of Art, Carson City Parks and Recreation, and Nevada Department of Transportation.

• • •
June 25, 2015

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“Jennifer Barreras – The Living Rock”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

32 year-old artist Jennifer Barreras was born and raised in Las Vegas, New Mexico. She has lived in Las Vegas, Nevada for the past eight years. Since late May she has been working on “The Living Rock,” a mural at the Arts Factory.

Jennifer adds: “I currently work as a psychosocial rehabilitation specialist and have been in the mental health field for over five years. The majority of people I have worked with have been orphaned and foster children.

The image I am currently creating for “The Living Rock” came to me in a dream. I have not been the same since.

The mural will depict the 4,700 foster children living in Las Vegas. This is my way of creating awareness and most importantly making their voices heard. I am creating an image that will help others understand the burden they carry and the magnitude of this issue.

I am also in the process of creating The Living Rock Foundation. It will include a website with links all to foster care agencies and orphanages in Las Vegas so that individuals can make donations or volunteer their services. If nothing else maybe people will send positive thoughts and energy to all these beautiful children who need it.

After I am done with this mural I have plans to do another where I’m from in New Mexico and then another and another. The vision is to create awareness in every state and then every country. This is going to be my life’s work and I am so gratetful that my journey has begun here in Las Vegas.”

The mural is scheduled for completion in late September.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
<June 24, 2015

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“Fins”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott

“The fins are on a 1958 Packard that I saw at the Best Dam Car Show in Boulder City last month.”

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
June 23, 2015

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“Stormy Sky | Red Shoe”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
El Cortez Parking Ramp Facing South.

“I want to go and go, and then drop dead in the middle of something I’m loving to do. And if that doesn’t happen, if I wind up sitting in a wheelchair, at least I’ll have my high heels on.”

–Dolly Parton

Google Street View

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner hits her marks.

• • •
June 22, 2015

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“Tree”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott

… and for your additional reading and visual pleasure:

Vox
April 19, 2015
“The bizarre history of cellphone towers disguised as trees”
by Joseph Stromberg

Wired
March 26, 2013
“Cellphone Towers Disguised as Trees are a Puzzling Attempt at Aesthetics”
by Peter Brook

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
June 21, 2015

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“Sugar, Cream, Salt ( & Pepper) ”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Vickie’s Diner.

“Breakfast Served any time.
EVERYTHING ON THE MENU IS SERVED 24 HOURS A DAY, ANY TIME OF THE DAY!”

April 2015 Google Street View.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a comfort food connaisseur. Fun fact: she puts ketchup on her hash browns and on her scrambled eggs.

• • •
June 20, 2015

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“Preservation Hall Jazz Band”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Brooklyn Bowl.
June 11, 2015

Preservation Hall Jazz Band derives its name from the Preservation Hall venue located in New Orleans’ French Quarter. The band is known for performing traditional New Orleans-style jazz.

The musicians in the groups have varied during the years since the founding of the hall in the early 1960s. Bands of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band perform at Preservation Hall on 726 St. Peter Street in the French Quarter, and tour around the world for more than 150 days a year.

Preservation Hall’s doors were closed through the fall and winter of 2005 due to Hurricane Katrina. Although the building remained shut until spring of 2006, the band continued to tour while the Hall was closed.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Bonus tracks | live performances:
That’s It!
Go To Mardi Gras
Bourbon Street Parade

Fun Fact: “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner played in an all girl Dixieland band in Japan.

• • •
June 19, 2015

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“Fun City”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré

“It shares a parking lot with a wedding chapel and a place where you can fire automatic weapons. There’s nothing more American than this.

I checked into Fun City around 2 a.m., several hours after the “Breaking Bad” finale. The clerk was a clear fan.”

From a picture story on the remarkable Murder Motels website.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
June 18, 2015

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Near Warm Springs and Jones
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
June 13, 2015
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
June 17, 2015

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“Resco”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-By” Series.

From the Whiskey and a Western Facebook Event Page:

Friday at 6:00pm
1120 Almond Tree Lane, Las Vegas, NV 89104
Hosted by The Huntridge Foundation

“Join us for our mini fundraiser, rescheduled to June 19th and at a new location…

Mosey on downtown for Whiskey and a Western, rescheduled for your viewing pleasure. We are showing Unforgiven starring Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, and Gene Hackman.

Brisk up now and get your tickets: $10 at the door or RSVP now. Admission includes your first gut warmer and a raffle ticket. Base-Burners thereafter are $5 a cup.

No ‘lil cowpokes please, film is rated R. Please leave your barking irons, six-shooters, and apple-peelers at home for this one, folks. Now get a wiggle on and get your tickets now!

Doors at 6pm, Film starts at 7pm. Come early and bring cash.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is forgiving.

• • •
June 16, 2015

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“6”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-By” Series.

6 is the smallest positive integer which is neither a square number nor a prime number. Six is the second smallest composite number; its proper divisors are 1, 2 and 3.

Since six equals the sum of its proper divisors, six is the smallest perfect number.

The evolution of our modern glyph for 6 appears rather simple when compared with that for the other numerals. Our modern 6 can be traced back to the Brahmins of India, who wrote it in one stroke like a cursive lowercase e rotated 90 degrees clockwise. Gradually, the upper part of the stroke (above the central squiggle) became more curved, while the lower part of the stroke (below the central squiggle) became straighter. The Ghubar Arabs dropped the part of the stroke below the squiggle. From there, the European evolution to our modern 6 was very straightforward, aside from a flirtation with a glyph that looked more like an uppercase G.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps busy at traffic lights.

• • •
June 15, 2015

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“Accident”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré
North Buffalo Drive & West Lake Mead Boulevard.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“An accident is an incidental and unplanned event that could have been prevented had circumstances leading up to the accident been recognized, and acted upon, prior to its occurrence. Injury prevention refers to activities designed to foresee and avoid accidents.

Accidents of particularly common types (crashing of automobiles, events causing fire, etc.) are investigated to identify how to avoid them in the future. This is sometimes called root cause analysis, but does not generally apply to accidents that cannot be deterministically predicted. A root cause of an uncommon and purely random accident may never be identified, and thus future similar accidents remain ‘accidental.'”

Text from Wikipedia.

MORE: The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department has a current traffic site, as does KSNV Channel 3. The latter is more vivid.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
June 14, 2015

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“From the Gallery, Looking North”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner at UNLV.
June 12, 2015
From the On Campus series

This Sunday, we launch “On Campus,” a new series that captures life and landscape on Las Vegas’ institutions of learning. We encourage all to send in pictures of their campus impressions and experience.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner earned her Bachelor’s degree at UNLV at the end of a highly creative, productive and adventurous ten years.

• • •
June 13, 2015

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“New York New York”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
New York Las Vegas Hotel & Casino.
June 12, 2015
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“I go to Paris, I go to London, I go to Rome, and I always say, ‘There’s no place like New York. It’s the most exciting city in the world now. That’s the way it is. That’s it.'”

— Robert De Niro

“Manhattan’s skyline, with its many skyscrapers, is universally recognized, and the city has been home to several of the tallest buildings in the world. As of 2011, New York City had 5,937 high-rise buildings, of which 550 completed structures were at least 330 feet high, both second in the world after Hong Kong.

The 1916 Zoning Resolution required setbacks in new buildings, and restricted towers to a percentage of the lot size, to allow sunlight to reach the streets below.The Art Deco style of the Chrysler Building (1930) and Empire State Building (1931), with their tapered tops and steel spires, reflected the zoning requirements. The buildings have distinctive ornamentation, such as the eagles at the corners of the 61st floor on the Chrysler Building, and are considered some of the finest examples of the Art Deco style.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner lives in a city that never sleeps.

• • •
June 12, 2015

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“High Roller”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

High Roller:
noun, Informal.
1. a person who gambles for large stakes, as in a casino.
2. a person who spends money freely for entertainment and extravagant living.
3. a corporation or governmental agency that invests or spends freely or recklessly.
Origin of high roller 1880-1885 Americanism

Text from Dictionary.com

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
June 11, 2015

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“Urban Sunset”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Celestial Painting (Sunset At Renvyle)

When painters leave this world, we grieve
For the hand that will work no more,
But who can say that they rest alway
On that still celestial shore?
No! No! they choose from the rainbow hues,
And winging from Paradise,
They come to paint, now bold now faint,
The tones of our sunset skies.
When I see them there I can almost swear
That grey is from Whistler’s brain!
That crimson flush was Turner’s brush!
And the gold is Claude Lorraine.

William Percy French

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
June 10, 2015

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“Moapa Camel”
Photograph by Cassidy Bowman
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

On Sunday April 26, 2015, the Moapa “Roos n More Zoo” set up camp in Downtown Las Vegas. Apparently this camel falls into the “more” category of featured animals.

Late last month, Kendra, editor of a blog dubbed “The Things I LOVE Most” wrote a glowing report on an on-site to the Zoo, although we caution readers to check ahead as it is not currently open to the general public.

Cassidy Bowman is a UNLV senior, double majoring in Journalism and Psychology. This spring she participated in Mary Hausch’s Advanced Reporting Class. This fall she will apply to law school. A fun fact, provided by Ms. Bowman: “I compulsively dance in public.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
June 9, 2015

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“El Cortez | Blue Sky Day”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

“The El Cortez Hotel and Casino is the longest continuously-running casino in Las Vegas. Located off the strip in the historic Downtown area, the El Cortez is the authentic Vegas experience that you have been craving.

The El Cortez first opened its doors downtown in 1941, and was so successful that it attracted the attention of Bugsy Siegel and Meyer Lansky, who bought the property. In 1963 it went from one ‘family’ to another, when Vegas icon Jackie Gaughan bought the El Cortez.”

Text from Casino website.

Ginger Bruner and the El Cortez embody the spirit of downtown.

• • •
June 8, 2015

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“L’Arc de Triomphe”
Photograph by Justin McAffee
Paris, Las Vegas.

“The Arc de Triomphe , the most monumental of all triumphal arches, was built between 1806 and 1836. Even though there were many modifications from the original plans, reflecting political changes and power struggles, the Arch still retains the essence of the original concept which was a powerful, unified ensemble.

The Arc de Triomphe stands at the centre of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the “Place de l’Étoile”. It’s located at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. The arches whole decorative style is entirely of the tradition of sculpture from the first half of the nineteenth century.

The triumphal arch is in honor of those who fought for France, in particular, those who fought during the Napoleonic Wars. Engraved on the inside and at the top of the arch are all of the names of the generals and wars fought. There are inscriptions in the ground underneath the vault of the arch which include the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier from World War I where the Memorial Flame burns and have made the Arc de Triomphe Paris a revered patriotic site.”

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
June 7, 2015

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“Plane | Moon | Building”
Photograph by JOn Miller
June 3, 2015.

From “Why is June called the Strawberry Moon?”, story by Pat Smith for the USA Today network:

“Some Native Americans named the first full moon of the month after predominant characteristics of the month. Thus the full moon that began on June 2 would be called the “strawberry moon” because most of the strawberries are picked in June.

Strawberries are the earliest fruit to ripen and are a particular pleasure along with the other pleasures of June. The strawberry (Fragaria x Ananassa) is well-suited for home gardeners because it is easy to grow and, once established, very productive.

In Greek and Roman times strawberries grew wild and became part of the symbolism of religion and medical treatment. Native Americans used leaves and roots of the strawberry in their treatments. They also mixed strawberries with cornmeal and baked it. The colonists later adapted this “cake” to be strawberry shortcake. The name ‘strawberry’ did not come from the straw that most gardeners use to mulch their berries through the winter; rather the name came from the word “to strew” because the tangle of vines looks as though the seeds were strewn on the bed.

Also, the strawberry is not a berry at all. The actual fruit is contained in the small brown seeds that are on the outside of the red enlarged part of the flower stem that we consume as luscious strawberries.”

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
June 6, 2015

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“Truckee River Facing East”
June 4, 2015. Reno, Nevada.

As the Arts @ The Heart Conference recedes into the rearview mirror, “Our Las Vegas” team makes one last nod to Nevada’s largest northern city, site of the Nevada Arts Council‘s gathering.

“The Truckee River (Washo: dabayóduweʔ) is a stream in California and Nevada. The river flows northeasterly and is 121 miles long. The Truckee is the sole outlet of Lake Tahoe and drains part of the high Sierra Nevada, emptying into Pyramid Lake in the Great Basin. Its waters are an important source of irrigation along its valley and adjacent valleys.

When John C. Frémont and Kit Carson ascended the Truckee River on January 16, 1844 they called it the Salmon Trout River, after the huge Lahontan cutthroat trout that ran up the river from Pyramid Lake to spawn. However, the river was ultimately named after a Paiute chief known as Truckee who in 1844 guided an emigrant party from the headwaters of the Humboldt River to California via the Truckee River, Donner Lake, and Donner Pass. Appreciative of their Indian guide’s services the party named the river after him.”
Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner has been down by the riverside.

• • •
June 5, 2015

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“Pioneer Sky”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
June 2, 2015. Reno, Nevada. Downtown. Late

The “Our Las Vegas” team is up in Reno in to participate in the Nevada Arts Council’s Arts @ The Heart Conference. As noted yesterday, over the next few days we’ll feature images from the north.

The Pioneer Center for the Performing Arts was originally to be called the Apollo Theater. The Pioneer took its name from a 1939 statue of a pioneer family by Byron S. Johnson, salvaged from the Old State Building, which was demolished to make way for the new facility. Unofficially, the dome was called the “Golden Turtle.” It consists of a 500-panel aluminum shell on an inner steel frame, which is in turn supported by reinforced concrete arches. The orchestra level of the theater is depressed below ground level, allowing the roof to nearly touch the ground at the corners.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner performed at the Pioneer Center as a student in the UNLV Music Program.

• • •
June 4, 2015

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“Cal Neva”
Photograph by Jon Winet
June 2, 2015. Reno, Nevada. Downtown. Late

The “Our Las Vegas” team traveled to Reno late last night to participate in the Nevada Arts Council’s Arts @ The Heart Conference. Over the next few days we’ll be featuring images of no_NV’s “Biggest Little City in the World.”

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet lived in Reno in a high rise on the Truckee River for awhile in the latter part of the 20th century.

• • •
June 4, 2015

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“Cal Neva”
Photograph by Jon Winet
June 2, 2015. Reno, Nevada. Downtown. Late

The “Our Las Vegas” team traveled to Reno late last night to participate in the Nevada Arts Council’s Arts @ The Heart Conference. Over the next few days we’ll be featuring images of no_NV’s “Biggest Little City in the World.”

“Our Las Vegas” Director Jon Winet lived in Reno in a high rise on the Truckee River for awhile in the latter part of the 20th century.

• • •
June 3, 2015

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“Ernie”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

Arte Nathan, featured on the May 27 edition of the Daily Frame kindly provided the biographical notes below.

Ernie is nearly 15 years old and loves living in the desert. Raised by Becky, Kathleen and Arte Nathan with a house full of dogs his age, he’s the kind of feline who comes when you call, loves hanging with people, and thinks it’s natural to cuddle up in bed with us and the other dogs. While he spent most of his life as a free-range cat here in Vegas, he has also lived in Laguna Beach and New York City, places where he was happy staying indoors and avoiding the crowds. Affectionately known as ‘Oonie,’ he enjoys summers in the Adirondack Mountains. Favorites include Fancy Feast dinners, lazing in sunny spots, kneading blankets, and head butting. He’s a purr-ty cool cat.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a big fan of Ernie’s. She has an extensive collection of cat pictures.

• • •
June 2, 2015

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“Clifford and Danita Morris”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas in front of the Cornerstone Gallery.
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

I.S.I. artist Cliff Morris is known for his airbrush creations of well-known celebrities. “You can often find him live-painting at places like The Beauty Bar and the Linq on the Strip,” notes the photographer.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
June 1, 2015

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“Ngate Hotel Casino Restaur”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-By” Series.

The Golden Gate Hotel & Casino opened in 1906 as the Hotel Nevada. In 1907 it was assigned Las Vegas’ first telephone with the number 1. In 1931, with gambling being re-legalized in Nevada, the Hotel Nevada was expanded and renamed Sal Sagev (Las Vegas spelled backwards.)

The hotel gained its current name in 1955 when a group of Italian-Americans from San Francisco Bay Area started the Golden Gate Casino. The 106-room, four-story hotel was renovated in 2005.

In March 2008, owner Mark Brandenberg sold a 50% interest in the property to Desert Rock Enterprises, the investment company of Derek and Greg Stevens, who also own the D.

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is always on the beat.

• • •
May 31, 2015

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“Valley of Fire”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Valley of Fire is Nevada’s oldest and largest state park, dedicated in 1935. Ancient trees and early man are represented throughout the park by areas of petrified wood and 3,000 year-old Indian petroglyphs. Popular activities include camping, hiking, picnicking and photography. The park offers a full-scale visitor center with extensive interpretive displays. Several group use areas are also available. The park is open all year. Valley of Fire State Park is six miles from Lake Mead and 55 miles northeast of Las Vegas via Interstate 15 and on exit 75.

HISTORY

The Valley of Fire derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of dinosaurs, 150 million years ago. Complex uplifting and faulting of the region, followed by extensive erosion, have created the present landscape.

Other important rock formations include limestones, shales, and conglomerates. Prehistoric users of the Valley of Fire included the Basket Maker people and later the Anasazi Pueblo farmers from the nearby fertile Moapa Valley.

The span of approximate occupation has been dated from 300 B.C.E. to 1150 C.E. Their visits probably involved hunting, food gathering, and religious ceremonies, although scarcity of water would have limited the length of their stay. Fine examples of rock art left by these ancient peoples can be found at several sites within the park.”

Text from Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Nevada State Parks website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner casts a long shadow.

• • •
May 30, 2015

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“From the Planet Hollywood Garage #2”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Third of of three photographs in a series. All now housed in the “Our Las Vegas” Daily Frame Archive.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner has excellent night vision.

• • •
May 29, 2015

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“Summer Garden”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas
Bellagio Las Vegas Conservatory & Botanical Gardens

Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines. The order includes both extant (living) and extinct species. The earliest known members of this group date from 157 million years ago, making turtles one of the oldest reptile groups and a more ancient group than snakes or crocodilians. Of the 327 known species alive today, some are highly endangered.”

Text from Wikipedia

NB: “Summer Garden” will be on display through September 12.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
May 28, 2015

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“From the Planet Hollywood Garage #2”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Second of a trio of photographs in the series. Both now housed permanently in the “Our Las Vegas” Daily Frame Archive.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner doesn’t miss many creative opportunities.

• • •
May 27, 2015

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“Arte (& Ernie)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

Arte Nathan served as Chief Human Resources Officer for Steve Wynn’s gaming companies from 1983 – 2006: he opened and helped operated all of Wynn’s casinos in Atlantic City, Las Vegas, Mississippi and China. Arte retired from the gaming industry in 2006 and moved to Southern California to live on the beach, consult and write: while there he helped develop and open the Resort at Pelican Hill. Arte moved back to Las Vegas in 2013 to become a full-time grandfather, Visiting Professor at UNLV’s Harrah College of Hospitality, and write (www.thearteofmotivation.blogspot.com). He is currently the Executive Director of the Center for Professional and Leadership Studies (PLuS Center), the Hotel College’s external executive education program.

Arte graduated from Cornell University in 1972 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial and Labor Relations. He has been the recipient of many awards for his work in Human Resources, community affairs and education. He is a frequent guest lecturer at colleges and universities, and has addressed numerous professional associations and conferences on the subjects of leadership and human resource management. He is an avid musician, hiker, canoeist and book enthusiast.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a fan of Arte’s – and of Ernie’s.

• • •
May 26, 2015

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“(A) View from the Bellagio”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Vdara to the left, Aria in the middle, parking cover to the right.”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
May 25, 2015

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“From the Planet Hollywood Garage”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“A planet (from Ancient Greek ἀστήρ πλανήτης, astēr planētēs, or πλάνης ἀστήρ, plánēs astēr, meaning “wandering star”) is an astronomical object orbiting a star or stellar remnant that
• is massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity,
• is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and
• has cleared its neighboring region of planetesimals.

The term planet is ancient, with ties to history, science, mythology, and religion. Several planets in the Solar System can be seen with the naked eye. These were regarded by many early cultures as divine, or as emissaries of deities. As scientific knowledge advanced, human perception of the planets changed, incorporating a number of disparate objects.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner rarely valets.

• • •
May 24, 2015

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“On the Road to Laughlin”
Photograph by Jon Winet
From the “Drive-By” Series.

U.S. Route 95 (US 95) is a major U.S. highway traversing the U.S. state of Nevada from north to south directly through Las Vegas and providing connections to both Carson City (via US 50) and Reno (via Interstate 80). US 95 is cosigned with Interstate 80 for 95 miles (153 km) between a junction in Churchill County and Winnemucca before heading north into Oregon at McDermitt.

Along much of its course through Nevada, US 95 has signs designating it as the Veterans Memorial Highway.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet gets mesmerized.

• • •
May 23, 2015

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“Gambling”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

Nevada Gaming Commission

“In 1959, the Nevada Gaming Commission (“Commission”) was created by the passage of the Gaming Control Act (“Act”). The Act laid the foundation for what would become modern gaming regulation.

The Commission consists of five members appointed by the Governor to four-year terms, with one member acting as Chairman. The Commission members serve in a part-time capacity.

The primary responsibilities of the Commission include acting on the recommendations of the Board in licensing matters and ruling upon work permit appeal cases. The Commission is the final authority on licensing matters, having the ability to approve, restrict, limit, condition, deny, revoke or suspend any gaming license.

The Commission is also charged with the responsibility of adopting regulations to implement and enforce the State laws governing gaming.

When the Board believes discipline against a gaming licensee is appropriate, the Board acts in the prosecutorial capacity, while the Commission acts in the judicial capacity to determine whether any sanctions should be imposed.”

Text from Commission website.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
May 22, 2015

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“Hilton (Grand Vacations Suites on the Las Vegas Strip)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Conrad Nicholson Hilton (December 25, 1887 – January 3, 1979) was an American hotelier and the founder of the Hilton Hotels chain.

As a young boy, Hilton developed entrepreneurial skills working at his father’s general store in Socorro County, New Mexico. This was followed by varied experiences, including a stint as a representative in New Mexico’s first State Legislature and a career decision to become a banker.

It was with the intention of buying a bank that he arrived in Texas at the height of the oil boom. He bought his first hotel instead, the 40-room Mobley Hotel in Cisco, Texas, in 1919, when a bank purchase fell through.

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner roams the streets.

• • •
May 21, 2015

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“Cindy Funkhouser”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”
May 2015

In honor of Throwback Thursday | #tbt we feature two vintage interviews spotlighting Funk House owner and Arts District trailerblazer Cindy Funkhouser. The articles both highlight Cindy’s vital role in Las Vegas culture as founder of First Friday and the City’s hard times in the recent past.

July 2, 2009
Las Vegas Weekly
“The Interview Issue: Cindy Funkhouser”
by Scott Dickensheets

September 9, 2010
Vegas Seven
“Seven Question: Cindy Funkhouser”
By Sean DeFrank

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner knows her Las Vegas history.

• • •
May 20, 2015

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“Stormy Monday 2: Large Red Shoe | Large Storm”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.
May 18, 2015

For the second day running we feature Monday’s weather as viewed from the garage of the El Cortez Hotel and Casino – “the longest continuously-running hotel and casino in Vegas.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps an eye on the weather.

• • •
May 19, 2015

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“Stormy Monday (from the El Cortez Garage)”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.
May 18, 2015

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner keeps track of the weather.

• • •
May 18, 2015

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“The Plaza”
Photograph by Jon Winet
From the “Drive-By” Series.

The Plaza opened on July 2, 1971 with the owners including local businessmen: Sam Boyd, Frank Scott, Howard Cannon and Jackie Gaughan. Its original name was Union Plaza, in reference to the Union Pacific railroad station that originally stood at the site.

Before the discontinuation of the Desert Wind train route on May 10, 1997, Amtrak made its Las Vegas, Nevada station near the Plaza. The station and ticket windows were directly connected to the hotel. It was the only train station in the United States located in a casino.

Barrick Gaming Corporation acquired the Plaza from Jackie Gaughan and in late 2005 later ceded operation to majority owner Tamares Group. On July 1, 2005 after Tamares took control of the Plaza mayor Oscar Goodman made his opinions clear in an article in the Las Vegas Press. He said, ‘If I had my druthers, I would like to have somebody in place to discuss imploding the Plaza.’ He was referring to his desire to see the Plaza replaced with new construction that would create a scenic entrance to Union Park.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet wishes Don Draper had spent some time in Las Vegas.

• • •
May 17, 2015

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“View from Daggett Cemetery”
Photograph by JOn Miller

Daggett was originally founded in the 1880s just after the discovery of silver in the mines near Calico to the north. In 1882, the Southern Pacific Railroad with the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad was being completed in the area. It was decided to name the city after then Lieutenant Governor of California, John Daggett, during the Spring of 1883.

Daggett became quite a big city in the 1890s, boasting to have three stores, two restaurants, three saloons, three hotels, a lumberyard, and even a Chinese eating place. But after 1911, when richer borax deposits were discovered north of Daggett in Death Valley at the Lila C. Mines, all the mining operations were moved up there which caused Daggett to go into a steady decline, which continues even to this day. But after the establishment of the solar energy plants, Daggett still struggles to hang on to life and there are still some people which travel through the town to reach Yermo, California and Las Vegas today.

Text adapted from Wikipedia

More: “When in Daggett, drop by the pioneer cemetery”
2010 Examiner.com travel story by Kenneth Brantingham

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran. He has also been known to travel roads less travelled with fellow photographer Andrea Lipomi.

• • •
May 16, 2015

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“Sky Wires Palms”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
May 15, 2015

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“Sky Wire Palms”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
May 15, 2015

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“NW Las Vegas Street View with Traffic Cone”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “In the Neighborhood” series.

Traffic cones, also called traffic pylons, road cones, highway cones, safety cones, witch’s hat, or construction cones, are usually cone-shaped markers that are placed on roads or footpaths to temporarily redirect traffic in a safe manner. They are often used to create separation or merge lanes during road construction projects or automobile accidents, although heavier, more permanent markers or signs are used if the diversion is to stay in place for a long period of time.

Traffic cones were invented in 1940 by American Charles D. Scanlon, who got the idea for the traffic cone while working as a painter for the Street Painting Department of the City of Los Angeles. The patent for his invention was granted in 1943.

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner respects and fears traffic cones.

• • •
May 14, 2015

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“From the middle of The Grand Bazaar “
Photograph by Shirelle Moore

Grand Bazaar Shops is an immersive experience that captures the essence of the world’s greatest open-air markets. From world-renowned brands to local favorites to unique discoveries – explore a multitude of shops, dining options and a sparkling light-and-sound show every night at 9 p.m. and 12 midnight.

From the Bazaar website.

The Grand Bazaar (Turkish: Kapalıçarşı, meaning ‘Covered Bazaar’; also Büyük Çarşı, meaning ‘Grand Bazaar’) in Istanbul is one of the largest and oldest covered markets in the world, with 61 covered streets and over 3,000 shops which attract between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors daily. In 2014, it is listed No.1 among world’s most-visited tourist attractions with 91,250,000 annual visitors.

Text from Wikipedia.

Shirelle Moore is a double major at UNLV, studying Broadcast Journalism and Special Education. She loves anything to do with video production and comments that “a video camera is her favorite accessory.” She adds: “I have lived in Las Vegas for pretty much my whole life, but there was short time when Tulsa, Oklahoma was considered home.”

One final note: she has an obsession with the Disney movie Aladdin.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
May 13, 2015

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“NW Las Vegas”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “In the Neighborhood” series.

North West Las Vegas by the numbers.*

* Please note: “City-data.com does not guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information on this site.” To which we add that the most recent date on the site is 2011.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner gets around.

• • •
May 12, 2015

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“Abandoned Home”
Photograph by JOn Miller

Editor’s note: Follow-up to the artist’s “Abandoned Pool” photograph featured on the May 2, 2015 Daily Frame and currently in the Daily Frame Archive.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
May 11, 2015

jw_wheel_of_fortune

“$3,827, 157.07”
Photograph by Jon Winet. McCarran Airport. January 2014

“Merv Griffin conceived Wheel of Fortune just as the original version of Jeopardy!, another show he had created, was ending its 11-year run on NBC with Art Fleming as its host. Griffin decided to create a Hangman-style game after recalling long car trips as a child, on which he and his sister would play Hangman. After he discussed the idea with Merv Griffin Enterprises’ staff, they thought that the idea would work as a game show if it had a “hook”. He decided to add a roulette-style wheel because he was always “drawn to” such wheels when he saw them in casinos. He and MGE’s then-president Murray Schwartz consulted an executive of Caesars Palace to find out how to build such a wheel.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet loves McCarran on arrival. Not so much on departure.

• • •
May 10, 2015

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“Hoover Dam”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi.

Where is Hoover Dam?
In Black Canyon spanning the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada, about 30 miles southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada.

How tall is Hoover Dam?
It is 726.4 feet from foundation rock to the roadway on the crest of the dam. The towers and ornaments on the parapet rise 40 feet above the crest.

How much does Hoover Dam weigh?
More than 6,600,000 tons.

What type of dam is Hoover?
A concrete arch-gravity type, in which the water load is carried by both gravity action and horizontal arch action.

— From “Hoover Dam – Frequently Asked Questions and Answers” on the Bureau of Reclamation website.

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is an alumna of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY; and the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas. You couldn’t ask for a better neighbor.

• • •
May 9, 2015

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“At the Bar”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
First in the series “At the Bar”*

* Candidates for the “At the Bar” series welcome from all photographers! Send 600 x 600 px or larger files (or questions) to ourlasvegas at gmail dot com.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can occasionally be found at the bar.

• • •
May 8, 2015

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“Center Spot”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

The Smith Center for the Performing Arts Mission Statement:
“To provide and preserve a high-quality performing arts center that is embraced by the community and recognized as a vital force by supporting artistic excellence, education and inspiration for all.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a bright spotlight on the Radiant City.

• • •
May 7, 2015

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“Circus Circus Drive-by”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

Circus Circus was opened on October 18, 1968 by Jay Sarno, becoming the flagship casino for Circus Circus Enterprises. Architects Rissman and Rissman Associates designed a giant circus tent shaped main structure, which was built by R.C. Johnson Construction of Las Vegas.

At its opening, the $15 million facility only included a casino. The lack of a hotel resulted in financial problems, as the casino was not able to attract high rollers. Sarno obtained a $23 million loan from the Teamsters Pension Fund to construct a hotel. As part of the arrangement, the Chicago Outfit’s enforcer, Anthony Spilotro (under the name of Tony Stuart) was granted a gift shop concession in the hotel. In addition to a government investigation into the organized-crime connections, Sarno was also being investigated for tax code violations. The casino’s financial problems also continued and Sarno, along with his partner Stanley Mallin, decided to sell out.

In 1974 ownership changed with the sale of the casino to William Bennett and William Pennington for $25 million. The facility was expanded with hotel tower additions in 1972, 1980, 1985 and 1986 and 1996.”

Text from Wikipedia.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
May 6, 2015

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“Cemetery Pet”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

Not your typical addition to this series, but given Andrea’s aesthetics and interests – and the Radiant City’s mostly easy co-habitation with the desert, it is arguably a perfect fit.

Note – a visit to the Daily Frame Archive and search for “August 10” will provide information on the Boulder City’s secret pet cemetery. A search for “Andrea Lipomi” will return all her contributions in the last thirteen months. (And we’re working on a backfill operations that will make the complete 2012-present archive of Daily Frames accessible.)

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is an alumna of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY; and the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas. You couldn’t ask for a better neighbor.

• • •
May 5, 2015

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“High Roller Down Under”
Photograph by Sallyann Ficarrotta.

“High Roller was announced in August 2011 as the centerpiece of Caesars Entertainment Corporation’s $550 million The LINQ. Arup Engineering, which previously consulted on the Singapore Flyer, acted as the structural engineer.
….
The passenger cabins (or capsules) are mounted on the wheel’s outboard rim and are individually rotated by electric motors to smoothly maintain a horizontal cabin floor throughout each full rotation. Preliminary designs anticipated 32 passenger cabins, each with a 40 passenger capacity —with the final design accommodating 28 40-person cabins and a total capacity of 1,120 passengers.

Each 225-square-foot cabin weighs approximately 44,000 pounds, has a diameter of 22 feet (6.7 m), includes 300 square feet of glass, and is equipped with eight flat-screen televisions and an iPod dock.”

Text from Wikipedia.

The photographer adds: “Many people are used to seeing pictures of the 550 foot tall observation wheel as a whole. This perspective is from the very bottom center of the High Roller. It was taken from below potentially 1,120 people (assuming each capsule was full).

It was taken after I saw a Korn concert at the Brooklyn Bowl. It was the first time ever the band played their first album from start to finish at a concert. Korn is one of my favorites bands. I’ve wanted to see them for many many years. It was my first time down at The Linq. When I saw the High Roller I thought to myself, I have never seen the observation wheel pictured from below before. I’d only pictured it as a whole.”

Sallyann Ficarrotta is a journalism student at UNLV. She enjoys writing and photography.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
May 4, 2015

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“Final Night at the Riv”
Photograph by Sallyann Ficarrotta.
May 3, 2015

The photographer writes: “The Riviera Hotel & Casino closes today at noon. This is one of my last pictures of the Casino before the doors close forever. Some of the greatest musicians and comedians of all time have performed at the Riviera including Frank Sinatra, Liberace, Joan Rivers and Jerry Seinfeld.”

More:
Wikipedia entry for the Casino.
• April 4, 2003 Las Vegas Sun story by Liz Benston “Offer spotlights issues facing Riviera Holdings”

Sallyann Ficarrotta is a journalism student at UNLV. She enjoys writing and photography.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
May 3, 2015

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“Wetlands Park”
Photograph and text by Jocelyn Luna.

The Clark County Wetlands Park gives a taste of the great outdoors. The park is rich with desert scenery and a variety of different plants and animals. For those wanting to take a walk or a jog, there are trails that circle the park as well as others that lead to a small tranquil pond.

The park is a great place to take kids. Right near the pond is a sitting area for picnics. There is also a Nature Center & Exhibit Hall where visitors can learn about the many different species and animals that can be found in the park.

Jocelyn Luna is a journalism & media studies student at UNLV. She was born in San Francisco, CA and moved to Las Vegas when she was 12 years old. She has lived in Las Vegas for the past nine years. She plans to graduate in Fall 2016 and pursue a career in broadcast and print journalism.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
May 2, 2015

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“Abandoned Pool”
Photograph by JOn Miller.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran. But as you can see from today’s offering, JOn’s aesthetic and social chops extend beyond the skies and the runways!

• • •
May 1, 2015

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“First Friday | Closing Night”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

Alios is also currently hosting the Contemporary Arts Center’s 26th annual juried exhibition. Tonight the exhibition closes. We encourage you to add Alios to your First Friday itinerary!

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is SO going to First Friday.

• • •
April 30, 2015

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“NAB”
Photograph by Alexa Vita.

“The National Association of Broadcasters registered attendance of 103,042 for their 2015 NAB Show, the world’s largest annual convention covering filmed entertainment and the development, management and delivery of content across all mediums. The exhibition featured 1,789 companies spanning 1,015,000 net square feet of exhibit space.”

Text from NAB website.

Alexa Vita is a 20 year-old junior studying at UNLV in journalism and media studies with a focus in broadcasting. She notes: “I have wanted to be a news anchor since I was 12. At NAB I was working at the Sony digital imaging booth showing buyers the 4k action cam. I learned so much during the week interning for Sony. They are a great team and I am lucky I got to experience the convention.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students and alumni of Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 29, 2015

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“Cityscape with Mural and Cement Replicas of Spray Paint Cans”
Photograph by Justin McAffee .

“If you put a blanket over a flower, that flower will try to find the sun, I think there’s this natural gravitation towards organic growth and towards your context as an individual and your intuition as an individual, if you keep that as an open channel you will gravitate towards your full and lustrous tree. You will evolve, you just need good soil and inspiration and all of a sudden you will become exactly what you wanted to be in the beginning.”

— Muralist Zio Ziegler from Pargadigm Magazine interview “The Human Condition by Lee Nentwig and Theo Constantinou.

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast in his free time, and a digital media manager for downtown Las Vegas-based public relations firm Ramirez Group. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
April 28, 2015

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“Planet Hollyood”
Photograph by Camalot Todd.

Planet Hollywood was originally the Aladdin Resort & Casino. The Aladdin opened in 1966 and was where Elvis and Priscilla Presley got married the following year. After multiple changes in ownerships the Aladdin closed in 2003 and renovations began. Planet Hollywood opened in 2007. In the Miracle Mile Mall some of the remnants of the Aladdin remain like the high ceilings.”

Camalot Todd is a UNLV Journalism student. She reports that she grew up in Denver and “on the Grateful Dead.”

She was adopted on her 11th birthday and moved to Las Vegas. She notes that after ten years here she still doesn’t have a tan.

Camalot is married to Nick Lopez “because he makes me French press coffee every morning. It’s true love.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in – and alumni of – Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 27, 2015

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“German-American Club Clubhouse”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“Founded in June of 1971 by a determined group of five people, meetings and gatherings took place in various locations throughout the Las Vegas valley. With time and growth The German-American Social Club purchased our current Clubhouse we now call home in 1981 at 1110 East Lake Mead, Las Vegas. Our purpose is to educate and preserve our German traditions, culture and heritage and to regularly meet in friendship welcoming both German and non-German speaking individuals to join us.

Our club is open Thursday through Saturday with traditional German fare being served Saturday nights at 6pm. Our annual events include various German entertainments, in-house dance groups and carnival groups and one of the largest Oktoberfest celebrations in the region.

Whether you are a native German or of German heritage or even love everything German, come, celebrate your German spirit and youth with us at the German-American Social Club of Nevada.”

Text from Club website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer and Tuba player Ginger Bruner puts the oom in the oom-pah-pah. She noted: “This will be my view (with lots of people in it) from the band stand where my trio, The Gingersnaps, is performing.”

• • •
April 26, 2015

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“Blue Angel in Ruins”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott. January 16, 2015.

Editor’s Note: With the death of Betty Willis earlier this week, we reprise text that accompanied Kim Caine‘s July 2, 2014 “Blue Angel Sky”, pulled from the Daily Frame Archive.

“(Betty Willis‘) career spanned the glory days of neon, the Vegas night a gigantic tumbler carbonated with light. One of the city’s first commercial artists, she started in the 1940’s, designing newspaper ads for Vegas shows, perfecting showgirls kicking across the page. In the early 1950’s she began designing neon motel signs. One was for the Blue Angel, its flittering neon bluebirds peeling back a bedroom curtain, a revolving angel pointing her wand at the motel.”

Text excerpted from a January 13, 2005 New York Times article “AT HOME WITH: Betty Willis; A Neon Come-Hither, Still Able to Flirt” by Patricia Leigh Brown.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
April 25, 2015

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“New York New York Las Vegas Skyline”
Photograph by Jon Winet. March 2014.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“The idea of a casino modeled after the New York skyline was conceived by Sig Rogich (a former White House staffer and United States Ambassador to Iceland) and Mark Advent. Rogich brought the idea to his friend, Gary Primm, head of Primadonna Resorts. Primm approached MGM president Bob Maxey in 1994 with the idea for MGM’s prime Strip location, and a joint venture was formed between the two companies. Construction began in March 1995.

Completed at a cost of $460 million, New York-New York opened on January 3, 1997.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” director Jon Winet daydreams while looking out the window on bus rides.

• • •
April 24, 2015

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“Alios”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

From the Alios website:

“Alios is proud to celebrate our 11th year of offering Las Vegas a specialized lighting agency with a focus on lighting systems and the integration of contemporary fixtures and interesting solutions to lighting projects. Alios does not simply see lighting products as providing illumination; but as one of the materials in the creation of the art of light and in the promotion of good design.”

Alios is led by Todd VonBastiaans and Bryan McCarthy, local cultural animators of Todd + Bryan fame; and Nick Mays.

Alios is also currently hosting the Contemporary Arts Center’s 26th annual juried exhibition through May 1. [map]

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner may be across the street at the Velveteen Rabbit.

• • •
April 23, 2015

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“At the Circus”
Photographer Unknown.
From the collection of Peggy King.

Editor’s Note: Although we’re big fans of #tbt–Throwback Thursday, it’s not usually our jam as our project seeks to document contemporary lifein the Radiant City. Today we’re making an exception with an exceptional image forwarded to us by Peggy King. She writes: “The name of the clown on the left is Wayne Sidley, who is now a pastor in Florida. This was taken years ago. I’m pretty sure we were playing Long Island, NY, but I don’t recall the name of the arena. Former Pres. Nixon was in a box there and the performance director brought two clowns to meet him. (Wayne and me.) Mom hated this shot. Dad loved it.”

Richard Milhous Nixon was the 37th President of the United States, in office from 1969 to 1974. He is only U.S. president to resign the office.

Peggy King, a graduate of the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law, is a mediator in the Clark County Courts, Mediators of Southern Nevada, and Family Mediation Center – Clark County Family Courts & Services Center.

“Our Las Vegas” is grateful to Peggy for generously sharing this priceless family album photograph.

• • •
April 22, 2015

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“Herbert”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.
Floyd Lamb Park at Tule Springs

We’re guessing Tule Spring resident “Herbert” is named after John Herbert Nay*, “the first non-American Indian to file a water right to Tule Springs.”

* Source: November 6, 2012 Las Vegas Review Journal article
“Tule Springs moniker evokes park’s earlier days” by Laura Phelps.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is not yet friends with Herbert on Facebook.

• • •
April 21, 2015

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“Hialeah”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott

“Hialeah (pronounced/ˌhaɪəˈliːə/) is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States.

The city’s name is most commonly attributed to Muskogee origin, ‘Haiyakpo’ (prairie) and ‘hili’ (pretty) combining in ‘Hialeah’ to mean ‘pretty prairie’. Alternatively, the word is of Seminole origin meaning ‘Upland Prairie’.”

Google Street View

Text from Wikipedia.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
April 20, 2015

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“Binion’s Tower”
Photograph by Justin McAffee

Designed by Zick & Sharp Architects, the tower was an addition to the Mint Casino in 1965 prior to the Mint’s purchase by Binion’s Horseshoe Casino in the late 1980s. Hunter S. Thompson wrote about a stay in his novel “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.*”

* Rolling Stone article: Fear And Loathing In Las Vegas: A savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream
By Hunter S. Thompson November 11, 1971

Justin McAffee has lived in Las Vegas since moving here from Southern Illinois in 2001. He is an amateur photographer and outdoor enthusiast in his free time, and a digital media manager for downtown Las Vegas-based public relations firm Ramirez Group. You can follow his outdoor journeys at adventurenevada.com.

• • •
April 19, 2015

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“Coming out of Titus Canyon”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré
April 1, 2015

The photographer writes: “When I came out of Titus Canyon, l wrapped around past Scotty’s Castle on the road that leads to NV hwy 267. I saw a small dried lake bed and pulled over to get a closer look. It wasn’t a “no trespassing” fenced off area, so I drove onto it. The ground was incredibly hard, almost like cement. And given the tire marks all around, a popular area for wind surfing and dune buggies no doubt!

I have tried to Google the area & mile marker I was near hoping to get info on the body of water that used to be there, but no luck.”

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
April 18, 2015

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“Main Street”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Las Vegas Weekly April 15 review by Kristy Totten reposted in its entirety below.

“CAC’s Latest Show Reflects Its Curators’ Instincts”

Command and control. Craftsmanship. A unique voice. Those were the guiding requisites of Contemporary Arts Center’s 26th annual juried show, curated by sculptor Rebekah Bogard and painter Max Presneill. The 45 selected works reflect Presneill’s large, colorful abstracts and Bogard’s whimsical yet subversive animal sculptures. This year, CAC added a second juror and a people’s choice award, given to Mikayla Whitmore (photo coordinator for the Weekly) for “We’ll Miss You,” a photo of a balloon peeking from a dumpster at the Grand Canyon.

“There’s a little some-thing for everybody,” says CAC VP Erin Stellmon. “There’s wildly abstract gigantic pieces, and there are more realistic, intimate pieces and figurative works. There are headscratchers that make you think, ‘I’m not sure if I like this, but I kinda like that I’m not sure.”

“Sky Is a Landfill,” an ethereal mixed-media skyscape by Rachel Stiff, won best in show for being contemporary and experimental with strong control of materials and color. Janie Askew took first place for “Nose Bleed,” an “oddball” graphite and watercolor piece showing a bleeding woman at the end of a staircase. “It has a strong original voice, and the artist seems to have a formal understanding of art history,” Bogard says, pointing to the subject’s body type and pose. “It’s also comical; there’s an inordinate amount of blood.”

Las Vegas expat (and former Weekly writer) Abigail Goldman and Las Vegan Chris Bauder took second and third. Nevada artists represented 40 percent of selected works. “We were looking for work that was really professional,” Bogard says. “We were looking for things that didn’t look like student work or didn’t look like assignments.”

CAC Juried Show Through May 1; Saturday & Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Alios Gallery, 1217 S. Main St.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is on the beat.

• • •
April 17, 2015

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“Cashman Field”
Photograph by Nikiya Berry

The Las Vegas 51s have the proud distinction of being the longest enduring franchise in the history of professional sports in the state of Nevada. Las Vegas Triple-A baseball was born on April 10, 1983 before a crowd of 10,622 at Cashman Field. The 2015 season will mark the 33rd campaign in the Silver State (1983-2014).”

Tonight is their home opener. Play ball!

MORE: “51s to unveil talented roster in home opener against Fresno”
Story by Todd Dewey in the April 16 Las Vegas Review Journal.

Text from 51s website.

Las Vegas born and raised Nikiya Berry is a student in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies. Prior to enrolling, she attended the College of Southern Nevada and is currently a host and reporter on Front Row Center, a UNLV-TV arts and entertainment show airing on Cox PBS. She plans to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. She notes: “I can edit, shoot, report and write and like all of it. I am adventurous and inquisitive which eves me opportunities to meet new people and learn new things.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in – and alumni of – Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 16, 2015

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“Parokya ni Edgar”
Photograph by Stephanie Santana
Dive. April 1, 2015

The photographer writes: “This photo of Parokya ni Edgar front man Chito Miranda and bandmates was taken at a recent concert. The band stole my heart when I was 13. The concert brought back memories from back then and made me feel home again.”

Stephanie Santana is 22-year-old student at UNLV. She moved with her family to the United States in 2010. She notes: “I do not even remember when it started, but ever since I was a kid, music has been my love. It makes my heart flutter and my eyes weep. It is my passion and hobby. Music is my life.”

Here’s a link to an hour-long live performance by the band.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 15, 2015

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“Spring Bocce”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
Jaycee Park

As many of you likely already know, Bocce is the official sport of the “Our Las Vegas” crew. As we learned from the first paragraphs of its remarkably etymologically thorough Wikipedia entry: “Bocce (/bɒtʃi/; Italian pronunciation: [bɔttʃe]), sometimes anglicized as bocci, is a ball sport belonging to the boules sport family, closely related to bowls and pétanque, with a common ancestry from ancient games played in the Roman Empire. Developed into its present form in Italy (where it is called bocce, the plural of the Italian word boccia which means “bowl”), it is played around Europe and also in overseas areas that have received Italian migrants, including Australia, North America, and South America (where it is known as bochas, or bolas criollas in Venezuela, bocha in Brazil). Bocce was initially played among the Italian migrants but has slowly become more popular with their descendants and the wider community.

The sport is also very popular on the eastern side of the Adriatic, especially in Croatia, Montenegro and Herzegovina, where the sport is known in Croatian as boćanje (“playing boće”) or balote (colloquially also bućanje ). In Slovenia the sport is known as balinanje[8] or colloquially “playing boče” or bale (from Italian “bocce” and Venetian “bałe”, meaning “balls”). In Southern France the sport is also popular and known as Boule Lyonnaise.”

We invite you to learn more about the sport locally anget contact information on how to join a league by visiting the Italian American Social Club website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner takes Bocce seriously.

• • •
April 14, 2015

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“Wall Text”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

The photographer comments: “If I remember correctly, the postered wall is on 6th, just west of Fremont, right between La Comida and Commonwealth.”

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
April 13, 2015

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“LVCC”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“Las Vegas’ first, private equity club has stood the test of time and remains an elite Country Club in an international city and destination. An active membership, an exquisitely manicured and designed classic golf course designed by the legendary Ed Ault, an indoor and outdoor tennis facility, a stunning and architecturally unique clubhouse, and all of the amenities needed for an amazing lifestyle combine to make this your new home.”

Text from The Las Vegas Country Club website.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can tee it up.

• • •
April 12, 2015

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“Off-road Vehicle”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.

Daily Frame contributor Ms. Mendré writes: “This picture was taken on the drive into Titus Canyon on April 1st. On the way in, you pass thru an abandoned mining town called Leadfield, circa 1926-1927.

I ask that you please dedicate this shot to Mr. Glenn Elliott, whose automobile photography I love!”

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
April 11, 2015

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“Las Vegas Country Club Porte Cochère”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“A porte-cochère (/ˌpɔːrt koʊˈʃɛr/)is a porch- or portico-like structure at a main or secondary entrance to a building through which a horse and carriage (or motor vehicle) can pass in order for the occupants to alight under cover, protected from the weather.

The porte-cochère was a feature of many late 18th- and 19th-century mansions and public buildings. Well-known examples are at Buckingham Palace in London and at the White House in Washington D.C.

Text from Wikipedia.

Rumor has it, “Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner can golf. Check our Facebook page later today for confirmation – or a retraction.

• • •
April 10, 2015

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“Excalibur Tower | Luxor Light”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

Excalibur, named for the mythical sword of King Arthur, uses the Arthurian theme in several ways. Its facade is a stylized image of a castle. Until 2007, a wizard-like figure representing Merlin looked out from a high turret.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner gets it.

• • •
April 9, 2015

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“Tulips”
Bellagio Conservatory & Botanical Gardens. April 4, 2015.
Photograph by Hollie Taylor.

“It is believed the first tulips in the United States were grown near Spring Pond at the Fay Estate in Lynn and Salem, Massachusetts. From 1847 to 1865, Richard Sullivan Fay, Esq., one of Lynn’s wealthiest men, settled on 500 acres located partly in present-day Lynn and partly in present-day Salem. Mr. Fay imported many different trees and plants from all parts of the world and planted them among the meadows of the Fay Estate.”

Excerpted text from a lengthy entry on Wikipedia.

Hollie Taylor was born in New Orleans, and arrived in Las Vegas 35 years ago. She notes: “.My parents moved here when I was less then one year old. In fact, I am the oldest of six children and my brother Joe was the first newborn to arrive in ’85. It was pretty cool because he was featured on Channel 8 News and Gary Wadell came to our house for the interview.” She adds: “I truly love Las Vegas!!!”

Her mother graduated from UNLV in 1989 with a Bachelor of Science degree. Hollie will join her in December 2015 with a Journalism and Media Studies degree. Her son JonRoss joins the student body this fall as third generation Runnin’ Rebel.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 8, 2015

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“Harry The Cat & Friend”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

“Domestic cats are similar in size to the other members of the genus Felis, typically weighing between 8.8 and 11.0 lb. However, some breeds, such as the Maine Coon, can occasionally exceed 25 lb. Conversely, very small cats 4.0 lb have been reported. The world record for the largest cat is 47 lb. The smallest adult cat ever officially recorded weighed around 3.0 lb.

Cats average about 9–10 in in height and 18.1 in) in head/body length (males being larger than females), with tails averaging 11.8 in in length.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is feline-friendly.

• • •
April 7, 2015

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Golden Nugget Chandelier”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

“A chandelier /ˌʃæn.dəlˈɪər/ is a decorative ceiling-mounted light fixture. Chandeliers are often ornate, and normally use lamps. Crystal chandeliers have more or less complex arrays of crystal prisms to illuminate a room with refracted light. The earliest candle chandeliers were used by the wealthy in medieval times, this type of chandelier could be moved to different rooms. From the 15th century, more complex forms of chandeliers, based on ring or crown designs, became popular decorative features in palaces and homes of nobility, clergy and merchants. Its high cost made the chandelier a symbol of luxury and status.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
April 6, 2015

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Back of the House, Commercial Center, Easter. View from the Bank.”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner. April 5, 2015.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner gets around.

• • •
April 5, 2015

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“First Creek Trail View II”
Photograph by Victoria Bass. (Follow-up to last week’s Sunday Daily Frame)

To learn more about the the trail: story by Tom Pfaendler on the “Friends of Red Rock Canyon” First Creek Trail webpage.

Las Vegas native Victoria Bass “loves the city but loves the local nature more.” She’s a nature enthusiast and loves to go on weekly hikes. She is a senior at UNLV and majoring in Broadcast Journalism. With her degree expected in December 2015 she hopes to go into entertainment news. She comments: “I like to be in the know of everything that is going on in entertainment and love dedicating my time to it. However I do love those days when I can completely disconnect from the world and go on a nice nature hike.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 4, 2015

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“Palm | Moon | Stratosphere”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“In the late 1980s, the Stratosphere was conceived by Bob Stupak as an addition to his Vegas World casino. He initially wanted to create a tower resembling the Eiffel Tower in Paris, but the narrow footprint of the available property would not permit such a broad base. Searching for options, he contacted an engineering firm in Texas whose expertise was in designing radio transmission towers. … At the conception of the project, one of the planned rides was to be a giant ape that would carry riders up and down on one of the tower’s columns.”

Text from Wikipedia.

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a major proponent of the notion that the Stratosphere is a gift to the the cityscape that keeps on giving.

• • •
April 3, 2015

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“Early Evening at Jaycee Park”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
Justice Myron E. Leavitt and Jaycee Community Park

From Wikipedia:

Myron E. Leavitt (October 27, 1930 – January 9, 2004) was an American politician. He was the 27th Lieutenant Governor of Nevada from 1979 to 1983. He was a native of Las Vegas, Nevada, and served in many political positions, including the Clark County Commission from 1971 to 1974, and the Las Vegas City Council from 1975 to 1978. He was a member of the Democratic Party.

Leavitt was born in 1930 in Las Vegas to Myron ‘Mike’ Leavitt, a county highway department worker, and his wife Estella, a maid. Following graduation from Las Vegas High School in 1948, Myron E. Leavitt won an athletics scholarship to the University of Nevada, Reno.

Graduating from UNR with a degree in journalism, Leavitt returned to Las Vegas, where he worked as sports editor for the Las Vegas Review-Journal. With the encouragement of his brother, Leavitt entered the University of Utah College of Law, where he graduated in 1956, eighth in his class. He returned to Las Vegas, where he entered private practice.

Leavitt subsequently served as Justice of the Peace, Clark County Commissioner (as had his father), Las Vegas City Commissioner, and ultimately as the state’s Lieutenant Governor.

Following his term as Lt Governor, then-Governor Richard Bryan appointed Myron to the District Court in 1984, where Leavitt served until being elected to the Nevada Supreme Court in 1998, a position to which he was reelected in 2000, and was holding at the time of his death in 2004.

Leavitt had earlier run for the State Supreme Court twice (1988 and 1994) but failed to get elected. He ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1982.:

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner is a frequent visitor to the Jaycee Park. She is an active member of a Bocce team.

• • •
April 2, 2015

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“Eat is Beautiful.”
Photograph by Ashley Ranan.

The photographer notes: “After some digging I found this mural was painted by the Brazilian Collective “Bicicleta Sem Freio.” The two artists, Douglas de Castro and Renato Perreira, spent four days working on the mural during the 2014 Life is Beautiful festival. Their artwork spans Europe and America in cities such as London, Berlin, Miami, Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

** This information and more can be found on: www.streetartnews.net/2014/10/bicicleta-sem-freio-create-new-mural.html.”

Ashley Ranan is a Las Vegas transplant from Oahu, Hawaii. She is expected to receive her bachelor’s degree in journalism from UNLV in the fall of 2016. Her current focus is on integrated marketing communications.

In her spare time, Ashley can be found hiking the many trails in Nevada, including those of Red Rock Canyon and Boulder City’s Hot Springs. Next on her bucket list: exploring Crater Lake in Bend, Oregon.

This is her second contribution to The Daily Frame.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
April 1, 2015 (no foolin’)

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“Put a bird on it.”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

A bit outside the lines of our ususual “Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series” but something we thought appropriate for the day.

Stay tuned for details on the location of this smart artwork in public.

Enjoy the day.

Additional notes: Polly Weinstein provided the following information on Facebook: “Commercial Center! A tribute to the old Wharf bar perhaps?”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner gets around town with acute creative peripheral vision.

• • •
March 31, 2015

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“Highrise | Strat | Power”
Photograph by Ellie Mendre.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
March 30, 2015

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“Sebastian”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner. Fat Choy. Spring 2013.

March 24, 2015 Las Vegas Weekly story “Remembering Beloved Downtown-Scen Mainstay DJ Aurajin” by Mike Prevatt reprinted in its entirety.

“Few DJs could embody the musical heartbeat of Downtown better than DJ Aurajin. Take any mix of people in a Fremont East or Arts District venue and Aurajin knew how to unite them through his unmistakably personal curation of urban standards. From traditional hip-hop to funk/soul chestnuts to house and electro to indie—maybe ending on a downtempo or otherwise atmospheric note—the vinyl enthusiast born Lemuel Granada could appeal to everyone at once.

And if he didn’t win you over from behind his turntables, his bear hug and wide smile would close the deal.

Downtown could use that hug and smile right now. On Monday, Aurajin passed away at UMC at the age of 38. His nephew confirmed—via a Gofundme page established to help family with Aurajin’s remaining medical expenses and funeral—that the longtime DJ suffered an aneurysm on Sunday and never recovered.

UPDATE: A memorial for friends and family will take place Saturday, March 28 from 1-5 p.m. at Velveteen Rabbit. And a fundraising event honoring Aurajin will take place Thursday, April 2 starting at 7 p.m. at Backstage Bar and Billiards, featuring DJs and performers Rex Dart, Johnny Rox, Allen Miller and more.

We’ve lost not only one of the best DJs in Downtown—good enough to be longtime member of the Get Back, Bargain DJ Collective and Rawkerz crews, a platter-flipper in the back rooms of the Griffin (where he might play A Tribe Called Quest) and Insert Coin(s) (usually Michael Jackson), a resident at Tao and an opener for Massive Attack, one of his very favorite acts—but one of its most ardent supporters. For longer than most of us, he worked and played there; he even lived there. He was one of the area’s friendliest faces. I never heard anyone speak ill of him, nor did I ever see him seethe or scowl.

And you know someone is truly beloved when you lose track of all his pet names. Aurajin. Sebastian. Pokey. His nephew wrote that the Granada family called him Weng. Sometimes I’d just call him DJ, or neighbor, back when we lived three houses apart. And when we’d occasionally hang out with certain mutual friends of ours at, say, Beauty Bar or the old Buffalo, we had another name for him, the one I like the most—the one I think of when I see or recall his joyous, bespectacled face.

Groove eternally, Seabass.”

“Our Las Vegas” Lead Photographer Ginger Bruner was one of Sebastian’s many friends. He will be missed – and remembered with great and deep affection.

• • •
March 29, 2015

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“First Creek Trail View”
Photograph by Victoria Bass.

The photographer recommends: “Go on down the First Creek Trail at Red Rock and discover a relaxing trail with many hidden pounds and waterfalls.”

More: “First Creek Trail” by Tom Pfaendler on the “Friends of Red Rock Canyon” website. (Opening paragraphs below.)

“One of the great things about First Creek Canyon is that you don’t have to drive around the 13-mile scenic loop to get to it. But you’ll soon find that there are many great things about this hike, including a hidden waterfall! To get to the trailhead, drive west 4.2 miles past the visitor’s center on highway 159. Look for a dirt parking area carved alongside the road and a small sign announcing First Creek Canyon. Take extra caution to lock and secure your car, since it will be exposed to the highway for a couple of hours. This is an easy 3-mile hike and is suitable for the whole family.

The trail begins at an X-shaped burro gate designed to keep these beloved critters off of the highway. This is burro country and you are more than likely going to see some out here. Just remember the rules; no feeding or petting, these guys can kick, bite and spit! Once through the gate, you’ll cross a rocky wash and be on your way. The well-defined trail winds through the open desert, slowly making it’s way toward the canyon that is being cut by First Creek and then beyond to the rugged south side of Mt. Wilson. This area is widely used by the trail-ride folks, so don’t be surprised if you cross paths with a dusty-looking cowboy leading a rag-tag group of tourists on horseback.

Like Area 51, First Creek Canyon is home to a very well known secret: the waterfall. But most people will never see it because it’s quite well hidden. Of course, you’ll be able to find it because I’m going to tell you how to get there. After hiking for a mile or so you’ll notice that the trail comes much closer to the canyon. At that point, you’ll want to head toward the first big pine tree that you see growing along the canyon rim. Next to this tree you’ll find a little unmarked trail leading into the canyon, toward a couple of big diamond-shaped composite rocks, and then downward to the waterfall. For the high-tech hiker, this trailhead is located at N36° 04.827’ W115° 27.920’. After a quick descent, you’ll find yourself deep in a rocky grotto that is covered with delicate green ferns and tall shady trees fed by a large pool at the base of a waterfall. This is a very serene spot, a complete departure from the dry desert environment just above and a nice preview of more good things to come a little farther up the trail.”

Las Vegas native Victoria Bass “loves the city but loves the local nature more.” She’s a nature enthusiast and loves to go on weekly hikes. She is a senior at UNLV and majoring in Broadcast Journalism. With her degree expected in December 2015 she hopes to go into entertainment news. She comments: “I like to be in the know of everything that is going on in entertainment and love dedicating my time to it. However I do love those days when I can completely disconnect from the world and go on a nice nature hike.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
March 28, 2015

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“Atomic Abstraction”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

Captured during a recent excursion by our intrepid photographer to Las Vegas’ inimitable Atomic Liquors.

locate

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She occasionally enjoys a late night adult beverage.

• • •
March 27, 2015

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“Maryland Parkway at Fremont”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“South side of the building at the southeast side of Maryland Parkway at Fremont Street that houses PublicUs, Downtown’s new restaurant.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She is an excellent Restaurant Guide.

• • •
March 26, 2015

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“LRCBH”
Photograph by Nikiya Berry.

The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health (LRCBH) opened on May 21, 2010. It was designed by world-renowned architect, Frank Gehry of Gehry Partners in Santa Monica, California.

The Center operates as an outpatient treatment and research facility in downtown Las Vegas on land deeded to Keep Memory Alive, the fund raising arm of LRCBH, by the City of Las Vegas as part of its 61 acres Symphony Park. The Center is approximately 65,000 sq ft and includes 13 examination rooms, offices for health care practitioners and researchers, a “Museum of the Mind,” and a community auditorium.”

Text excerpted and adapted from Wikipedia.

Las Vegas born and raised Nikiya Berry is a student in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies. Prior to enrolling, she attended the College of Southern Nevada and is currently a host and reporter on Front Row Center, a UNLV-TV arts and entertainment show airing on Cox PBS. She plans to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. She notes: “I can edit, shoot, report and write and like all of it. I am adventurous and inquisitive which eves me opportunities to meet new people and learn new things.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in – and alumni of – Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
March 25, 2015

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“Apts”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

Downtowner Apartments129 N 8th St, Las Vegas, NV 89101

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
March 24, 2015

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“Trump”
Photograph by Ashley Ranan.

“The Trump Hotel Las Vegas is a 64-story luxury hotel, condominium, and timeshare located on Fashion Show Drive in Paradise, Nevada. It is named for famed real estate developer and presidential aspirant Donald Trump. It features both non-residential hotel condominiums and residential condominiums. The exterior windows are gilded with 24-carat gold.

Tower 1 opened on March 31, 2008. At the time of opening it was announced that Donald Trump, due to the overwhelming seller’s response from his first tower, intends to build a second, identical tower next to the first tower; the mid-2000s recession put that plan on indefinite hold. It is Las Vegas’s tallest residential building at 620 feet.”

Text excerpted and adapted from Wikipedia.”

Ashley Ranan is a Las Vegas transplant from Oahu, Hawaii. She is expected to receive her bachelor’s degree in journalism from UNLV in the fall of 2016. Her current focus is on integrated marketing communications.

In her spare time, Ashley can be found hiking the many trails in Nevada, including those of Red Rock Canyon and Boulder City’s Hot Springs. Next on her bucket list: exploring Crater Lake in Bend, Oregon.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
March 23, 2015

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“1960 Chevy”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

Chevrolet, colloquially referred to as Chevy and formally the Chevrolet Division of General Motors Company, is an American automobile division of the American manufacturer General Motors (GM).

Louis Chevrolet and ousted General Motors founder William C. Durant started the company on November 3, 1911 as the Chevrolet Motor Car Company. Durant used the Chevrolet Motor Car Company to acquire a controlling stake in General Motors with a reverse merger occurring on May 2, 1918 and propelled himself back to the GM presidency. After Durant’s second ouster in 1919, Alfred Sloan, with his maxim “a car for every purse and purpose,” would pick the Chevrolet brand to become the volume leader in the General Motors family, selling mainstream vehicles to compete with Henry Ford’s Model T in 1919 and overtaking the Model T as the best-selling car in the United States by 1929.”

Text from extensive Wikipedia entry for “Chevrolet.”

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
March 22, 2015

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“Tree Shadow”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis.
From series “Mom’s Backyard”.

“A shadow is an area where light from a light source is obstructed by an object. It occupies all of the space behind an opaque object with light in front of it.

Shadow length when caused by the sun changes dramatically throughout the day. The length of a shadow cast on the ground is proportional to the cotangent of the sun’s elevation angle—its angle θ relative to the horizon. Near sunrise and sunset, when θ = 0° and cot(θ) is infinite, shadows can be extremely long. If the sun passes directly overhead, then θ = 90°, cot(θ)=0, and shadows are cast directly underneath objects.”

Text excerpted from Wikipedia.

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
March 21, 2015

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“Dome | Reflection”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

The Circus Circus Adventuredome opened on August 23, 1993 in the west parking lot of the hotel. It sits on a reinforced 18″ thick deck elevated 18 feet above ground. The dome itself consists of over 350,000 sq ft of pink tinted, insulated glass over a teal green space frame (to minimize structural poles inside). Each pane of glass weighs approximately 300 lbs.

Text from Wikipedia.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
March 20, 2015

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“Lady Luck”
Photograph by Vanessa Vobis.
Neon Museum.

Wikipedia on the name Lady Luck

Locally: “Mayor calls Lady Luck casino ‘carcass’”Las Vegas Review Journal July 5, 2009 story by Benjamin Spillman with Alan Choate.

Vanessa Vobis is a Los Angeles-based artist. Her ecological interests began while growing up in rural Germany “down the street from cow and chicken farms.” Later, after emigrating to Northern California and the award of art history and studio art degrees from UC Berkeley and the University of Iowa, she began filling art galleries with water, algae, and terrariums in exhibitions across the United States.

Her current research operates at the intersection of education, horticulture, and art. As a Program Manager at the LA County Natural History Museum Vanessa collaboratively produces field trips, workshops, lectures, and performances with scientists and partnering organizations.

She is the co-founder of LA Green Grounds, a non-profit that sets up front-yard vegetable gardens throughout South LA.

• • •
March 19, 2015

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“GVR”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.

Map
Green Valley Ranch Resort Spa Casino website

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
March 18, 2015

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“South 17th Street Bump”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She may soon be riding a bicycle around town.

• • •

March 17, 2015

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“Team Wavy”
Photograph by Jon Winet.
March 17, 2014. The D.

“On St Patrick’s Day it is customary to wear shamrocks and/or green clothing or accessories (the “wearing of the green”). St Patrick is said to have used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagan Irish.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Jon Winet is the director of “Our Las Vegas.” He’s wearing green today.

• • •
March 16, 2015

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“Government Building Interior”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

“The Clark County Government Center serves as the government center building for Clark County, Nevada. The 350,000-square-foot complex designed by Fentress Bradburn and opened in 1995 consists of a six-story county administration building, three one-story buildings for the county commissioners’ chambers, a multipurpose community facility and a central plant. It includes space for government administration, a law enforcement complex, a performing arts complex, a child-care facility and structured parking. It also contains a single-story auditorium, a pyramid-shaped cafeteria and a cylindrical, six-story reception hall, as well as office buildings.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Official website

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
March 15, 2015

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“Lorenzi Park Geese”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
March 2015

Geese:
(excerpt from Wikipedia entry)
“The three living genera of true geese are: Anser, grey geese, including the greylag goose, and domestic geese; Chen, white geese (often included in Anser); and Branta, black geese, such as the Canada goose.

Fossils of true geese are hard to assign to genus; all that can be said is that their fossil record, particularly in North America, is dense and comprehensively documents many different species of true geese that have been around since about 10 million years ago in the Miocene.”

Lorenzi Park:
(excerpt of review by Daniel. S. in Yelp)

“Lorenzi Park is an oasis in downtown Las Vegas. It is an urban retreat for human beings and ducks.

In my eyes, the man-made lake is the gem of Lorenzi Park. It featured some of the best natural entertainers in Las Vegas: ducks and geese. I am an admirer of ducks (geese are cool too) and I never get bored watching them play. The water they played in is clean and stocked with fish. When I looked beyond the lake, I saw the Stratosphere clear and tall. When the ducks and geese grew tired of the water, they rested in their own island.”

MORE on the park.
(from Wikipedia)

David G. Lorenzi:
“In 1911 Lorenzi came to the Las Vegas Valley lured by the rumors of artesian wells that would transform the desert to farm land. He purchased 80 acres (32 ha) of property on the outskirts of town, about two miles west current downtown Fremont Street area in 1912.”

MORE on Lorenzi: February 7, 1999 Las Vegas Review Journal Story by K.J. Evans.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She is a surprisingly ardent nature enthusiast.”

• • •
March 14, 2015

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“Out at the Venetian”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
March 2015

Venice is a city in northeastern Italy sited on a group of 117 small islands separated by canals and linked by bridges. It is located in the marshy Venetian Lagoon which stretches along the shoreline, between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Venice is renowned for the beauty of its setting, its architecture, and its artworks. The city in its entirety is listed as a World Heritage Site, along with its lagoon.

The name is derived from the ancient Veneti people who inhabited the region by the 10th century BC.”

Text from Wikipedia.

More: City of Venice Official website.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. About her photograph she notes: “As heard at a certain place with a moist Italian theme, “are we inside?”…”

• • •
March 13, 2015

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“Inside the Tranquility Room at Spa Bellagio
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

“Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.”

–William Wordsworth

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• •
March 12, 2015

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“The Court of Miracles”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
October 2014

Maser first started painting graffiti in Ireland in 1995 and quickly gained a reputation as one of the most innovative artists working in the field. Alongside his paintings in the public realm, Maser also produces works on canvas, video and 3D installations. It is fair to say he is the most well-rounded artist at work in Ireland today with a capacity to do everything from quickly executed pieces to full scale cooperative projects.

Since 1995 he’s treated the world as his canvas leaving behind his artwork in every big city of Europe and United States. He has collaborated with world-renowned artists including musician Damien Dempsey, urban artists JR, Connor Harrington, and Fintan Magee, as well as the Little Museum of Dublin’s exhibition of U2 memorabilia. He completed an amazing installation for Limerick City of Culture’s international exhibition where he painted an old petrol station to launch the event. Maser recently partnered with retail landmark Brown Thomas on a unique and uplifting fusion of art and fashion along Dublin’s popular Grafton Street.

Maser was recently named one of the top seven Irish people to follow on Instagram by The Daily Edge, was named one of the 60 Most Creative People in Ireland by The Irish Times, and was named to Topman magazine’s “The Talent That’s Shaping the City.”

Text from Life is Beautiful website.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She has some favorite colors.”

• • •
March 11, 2015

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“Driving the Bus”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

Ginger notes: “Control view of KUNV on the UNLV Campus in Greenspun Hall. The operator of the board is referred to as the ‘person driving the bus.'”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She’s spinning those stacks of wax.

• • •
March 10, 2015

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“Ed Wilson”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner. February 28, 2015.
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

Ginger notes: “Ed Wilson, of 112 and Then Some at Charleston Heights Arts Center, playing for a monthly contra dance. Ed plays guitar, and his wife Vera Vann, seen behind him, plays banjo. They also are horse people.”

Information on future dances: Southern Nevada Old Time Country Dancers

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She’s in the band.

• • •
March 9, 2015

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“Hollywood”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“Britney Jean Spears (born December 2, 1981) is an American singer and actress. Born in McComb, Mississippi, and raised in Kentwood, Louisiana, she performed acting roles in stage productions and television shows as a child before signing with Jive Records in 1997. Spears’s first and second studio albums, …Baby One More Time (1999) and Oops!… I Did It Again (2000), became international successes, with the former becoming the best-selling album by a teenage solo artist.[1] Title tracks “…Baby One More Time” and “Oops!… I Did It Again” broke international sales records. In 2001, Spears released her self-titled third studio album, Britney, and played the starring role in the film Crossroads (2002). She assumed creative control of her fourth studio album, In the Zone (2003), which yielded the worldwide success of the “Toxic” single.”

Text from an extensive entry on Wikipedia for Britney Spears.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She has not yet attended Britney Spears’ “Piece of Me.”

• • •
March 8, 2015

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“Mom’s Backyard”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis.
From series “Mom’s Backyard”.

backyard
noun

1. : an area in back of a house; especially : an area of grass behind someone’s house
: the general area near and around someone’s home

2. : a nearby area : neighborhood

Text from Meriam Webster

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
March 7, 2015

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“St. Baldrick’s Day”
McMullan’s Irish Pub

Photograph of John L. Smith by Ginger Bruner.

From Mr. Smith’s March 5, 2015 Las Vegas Review Journal story, McMullan’s Irish Pub marking 9th year of St. Baldrick’s.

“Lynn McMullan was feeling tired.

Then she saw that pained look in the eyes of a young mother. She listened to a story, variations of which she’s heard countless times before, about a family’s struggle to save a child stricken with brain cancer.

She remembered her own loss. And McMullan was reminded once again of the importance of the annual St. Baldricks’ Foundation head-shaving fundraiser to benefit childhood cancer treatment and research.

Lynn and Brian McMullan, proprietors of McMullan’s Irish Pub, started the local St. Baldrick’s event and are now marking their ninth year. It’s set to start at 2 p.m. Saturday with donations accepted at the pub and at stbaldricks.org.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She’ll wake up this morning with a fine head of hair – but you may want to check back later this evening.

• • •
March 6, 2015

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“Night Rabbits”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis.
October 2014

Mural by Fintan Magee for the Life Is Beautiful Festival.

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
March 5, 2015

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“Building Suburbia”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

“A suburb is a residential area or a mixed use area, either existing as part of a city or urban area or as a separate residential community within commuting distance of a city. In most English-speaking regions, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner city areas.”

“Suburbs first emerged on a large scale in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of improved rail and road transport, which led to an increase in commuting. In general, they have lower population densities than inner city neighborhoods within an metropolitan area, and most residents commute to central cities or other business districts; however, there are many exceptions, including industrial suburbs, planned communities, and satellite cities. Suburbs tend to proliferate around cities that have an abundance of adjacent flat land.”

“The earliest appearance of suburbs coincided with the spread of the first urban settlements. Large walled towns tended to be the focus around which smaller villages grew up in a symbiotic relationship with the market town. The word ‘suburbani’ was first used by the Roman statesman, Cicero, in reference to the large villas and estates built by the wealthy patricians of Rome on the city’s outskirts.”

“Due to the rapid migration of the rural poor to the industrializing cities of England in the late 18th century, a trend in the opposite direction began to develop; – newly rich members of the middle classes began to purchase estates and villas on the outskirts of London. This trend accelerated through the 19th century, especially in cities like London and Manchester that were experiencing tremendous growth, and the first suburban districts sprung up around the city center to accommodate those who wanted to escape the squalid conditions of the industrial town. Toward the end of the century, with the development of public transit systems such as the underground railways, trams and buses, it became possible for the majority of the city’s population to reside outside the city and to commute into the center for work.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
March 4, 2015

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“One Epic Feast”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
March 3, 2015 – Oakey and Las Vegas Boulevard.

From blog.caesars.com:
“10 Reason Why Bacchanal Still Reigns as the Best Buffet in Las Vegas.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She shines light on the City. You may very well find her at this spot enjoying the Grilled Cheese with a Bowl of Soup luncheon special at Vickie’s Diner.

• • •
March 3, 2015

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“No Doubt”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

From the Monorail website:

“ONE OF THE MOST ADVANCED URBAN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS IN THE WORLD”

“The Monorail was originally envisioned as a joint venture between MGM Grand and Bally’s Hotel, with the idea to create a one-mile transportation system linking the hotels. This exciting and forward-thinking idea took flight in 1993 and soon included plans to expand to other locations along the Strip. In 1997, the State of Nevada passed legislation that enabled a private company to own, operate and charge a fare as a public Monorail system. Expansion plans evolved and a professional team, including Nevada-based Liaise Corporation, Bombardier Transportation, Granite Construction Company, Gensler & Associates, Carter-Burgess and Solomon Smith Barney, was assembled to develop the Monorail system.

In 2000, the nonprofit Las Vegas Monorail Company (LVMC) was formed and it acquired the original Monorail system. It is governed by its board of directors, appointed by the governor of Nevada, and led by President and CEO Curtis L. Myles III. Myles oversees the management of the system and company.

The Las Vegas Monorail Company runs the only privately owned public transportation system in the United States. The Monorail utilizes no public funds to operate the system. It aided in the annual removal of an estimated 1.8 million vehicle miles from Southern Nevada’s major roadways in 2012, reducing emissions by more than 23 tons of carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) over the course of the year.”

Wikipedia provides additional information on this unique 4 mile stretch of track.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
March 2, 2015

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“City Hall Landscape”
Photograph by Jon Winet.

Jon Winet is the director of “Our Las Vegas.”

• • •
March 1, 2015

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“Tree”
From series “Mom’s Backyard”.
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis.

“Trees for Tomorrow was created to educate Southern Nevada residents on the benefits of trees and to help homeowners choose the right trees for their landscape setting. The goal of this booklet is to help homeowners successfully select and establish trees. This Centennial edition recognizes the 100-year celebration of the founding of the City of Las Vegas.”

Text from Trees for Tomorrow, a Southern Nevada Guide to Tree Selection and Care.

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
February 28, 2015

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“Lane”
Photograph by Jon Winet.
July 2014

Southern Nevada Bike Map

More: February 20, 2014 Las Vegas Review Journal story by F. Andrew Taylor
“Street, law improvements making cycling safer in Las Vegas Valley.”

Jon Winet is the director of “Our Las Vegas.”</a. He frequently rides three of his four bicycles.

• • •
February 27, 2015

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“Street Lamp Sky”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Las Vegas Skies” Series.

“The first electric street lighting employed arc lamps, initially the ‘Electric candle’, ‘Jablotchkoff candle’ developed by the Russian Pavel Yablochkov in 1875. In 1876, the common council of the City of Los Angeles ordered four arc lights installed in various places in the fledgling town for street lighting. Yablochkov candles were first used to light the Grands Magasins du Louvre, Paris in 1878 where 80 were deployed—improvement which was one of the reasons why Paris earned its “City of Lights” nickname.”

Text adapted from Wikipedia.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She shines light on the City.

• • •
February 26, 2015

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“MGM-AEG Arena (From the New York New York Parking Garage)”
February 23, 2015.
Text and Photograph by Michael Palmer .

The MGM-AEG Arena will be a 20,000 seat multipurpose entertainment venue available to host basketball, boxing, UFC fights, hockey, concerts, award shows and other major events. The arena will open in the spring of 2016. The owners of the arena are AEG – Anschutz Entertainment Group and MGM Resorts International.

Michael Palmer, a Las Vegan born in Tarzana, California, graduated from the College of Southern Nevada last semester and is now a junior at UNLV majoring in Journalism & Media Studies. He hopes to be a baseball writer/reporter. He shares the following: “I once had the chance to meet Pete Rose at the Forum Shops at Caesars Palace and my dad played high school football with John Elway.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
February 25, 2015

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“Harry The Cat”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

Harry The Cat is a rescue from the stray cat population at the Clark County Library. He hit the existential lottery when he found a home in the yard of Suzanne Scott and Mark Baxter.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She thinks Harry the Cat is “a good boy.”

• • •
February 24, 2015

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“Red Rock Traffic Jam.” February 23, 2015
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

Ginger notes: “Snow! Everyone and their mom went out to Red Rock for nearby snow today.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She may very well have a pair of snow shoes in the back of her van.

• • •
February 23, 2015

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“Jamie Garcia”.
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

Jamie Garcia is a “Sandwich Princess | Author” – and “occasional comedian.” You can find her at the Boar’s Head counter at the White Cross Market.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She is a native Las Vegas Creative.

• • •
February 22, 2015

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“Paris, Las Vegas in the Rain”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
From the “Drive-By” Series.

“Rise above the frenzy of the Strip at one of Las Vegas’ premier attractions with amazing views. The Eiffel Tower tickets are available for purchase at the Eiffel Tower Gift Shop. An icon of the city skyline, the high-altitude attraction is located 46 stories up and is a half scale replica of the world-famous Paris, France landmark. The observation deck features 360 degree city views and knowledgeable Ambassadors point out Las Vegas landmarks.

A popular spot for weddings, the Eiffel Tower Experience is especially romantic at night. The views of the bright, colorful lights and the lit water show are unmatched. Double the romance with dinner a few stories down at the 11th floor Eiffel Tower Restaurant.

Stop by Kodak’s Total Snap Shot kiosk to purchase a commemorative photo of your “France in Vegas” experience in the sky. It’s a perfect keepsake for an unforgettable moment.”

Text from Paris Las Vegas website.

Meanwhile 5,421 miles east:

“The Eiffel Tower was built by Gustave Eiffel for the 1889 Exposition Universelle, which was to celebrate the 100th year anniversary of the French Revolution. Its construction in 2 years, 2 months and 5 days was a veritable technical and architectural achievement. ‘Utopia achieved’, a symbol of technological prowess, at the end of the 19th Century it was a demonstration of French engineering personified by Gustave Eiffel, and a defining moment of the industrial era. It was met immediately with tremendous success.

Only intended to last 20 years, it was saved by the scientific experiments that Eiffel encouraged, and in particular by the first radio transmissions, followed by telecommunications. For example, the radio signals from the Pantheon Tower in 1898; it served as a military radio post in 1903; it transmitted the first public radio program in 1925, and then broadcast television up to TNT more recently.

Since the 1980s, the monument has regularly been renovated, restored and adapted for an ever-growing public.

Over the decades, the Eiffel Tower has seen remarkable achievements, extraordinary light shows, and prestigious visitors. A mythical and audacious site, it has always inspired artists and challenges.

It is the stage for numerous events of international significance (light shows, the Tower’s centenary, the Year 2000 pyrotechnic show, repainting campaigns, sparkling lights, the blue Tower to mark France’s Presidency of the European Union or the multi-coloured Tower for its 120th birthday, unusual fixtures, such as an ice rink, a garden etc.).

A universal Tower of Babel, almost 250 million visitors regardless of age or origin have come from all over the planet to see it since its opening in 1889.

Like all towers, it allows us to see and to be seen, with a spectacular ascent, a unique panoramic view of Paris, and a glittering beacon in the skies of the Capital.

The Tower also represents the magic of light. Its lighting, its sparkling lights, and its beacon shine and inspire dreams every evening.

As France’s symbol in the world, and the showcase of Paris, today it welcomes almost 7 million visitors a year (around 75% of whom are foreigners), making it the most visited monument that you have to pay for in the world.”

Text from Tour Eiffel website.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She stops for good views of the Radiant City.

• • •
February 21, 2015

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“Cadillac Ramp”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.

Cadillac, formally the Cadillac Motor Car Division, is a division of U.S.-based General Motors Company that markets luxury vehicles worldwide. Its primary markets are the United States, Canada, and China, but Cadillac-branded vehicles are distributed in 34 additional markets worldwide. Historically, Cadillac automobiles have always held a place at the top of the luxury field within the United States. In 2012, Cadillac’s U.S. sales were 149,782 vehicles.

Cadillac is among the oldest automobile brands in the world, second in America only to fellow GM marque Buick. The firm was founded from the remnants of the Henry Ford Company in 1902, almost 9 years before Chevrolet. It was named after Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, who founded Detroit, Michigan. The Cadillac crest is based on his coat of arms.

Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac (March 5, 1658 – October 16, 1730), was a French explorer and adventurer in New France, an area of North America that stretched from present-day Eastern Canada in the north to Louisiana on the Gulf of Mexico in the south. Rising from a modest beginning in Acadia in 1683 as an explorer, trapper, and a trader of alcohol and furs, he achieved various positions of political importance in the colony.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
February 20, 2015

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“Cosmopolitan Digital Architecture”
Photograph by Vanessa Vobis. Cosmopolitan Las Vegas.

From the DK* website:

“The Cosmopolitan’s unique digital architecture, composed of over 500 screens, demanded artistic consideration. To appeal to resort’s curious customers, we partnered with The Cosmopolitan to transform the entire facade into immersive displays of sophisticated design content.

Immediately upon entering the lobby, visitors are captivated by eight towering, floor-to-ceiling architectural columns showing ever-changing poetic films. The powerful imagery is at once engaging, provoking, and entertaining.”

* “DK – Digital Kitchen – is a creative and digital agency who has been shaping culture for nearly 20 years. By putting emotion first, we have broken new ground and redefined categories through our creative work — from re-inventing the TV main title, to setting the new standard in experience design, to launching a multi-billion dollar entertainment platform. Our thirst for innovation and tendency to ask “what if” attracts not only the worlds leading brands, but the best creative and strategic talent in the world.”

Vanessa Vobis is a Los Angeles-based artist. Her ecological interests began while growing up in rural Germany “down the street from cow and chicken farms.” Later, after emigrating to Northern California and the award of art history and studio art degrees from UC Berkeley and the University of Iowa, she began filling art galleries with water, algae, and terrariums in exhibitions across the United States.

Her current research operates at the intersection of education, horticulture, and art. As a Program Manager at the LA County Natural History Museum Vanessa collaboratively produces field trips, workshops, lectures, and performances with scientists and partnering organizations.

She is the co-founder of LA Green Grounds, a non-profit that sets up front-yard vegetable gardens throughout South LA.

This is her third contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
February 19, 2015

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“Year of the Goat (新年快樂)”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi. Bellagio Conservatory & Botanical Gardens.

From the Independent:
“Chinese New Year 2015: 6 things you need to know about the Year of the Goat (or Sheep)”

#4 Goat or sheep?

“2015 is the year of the goat, but you may see it referred to as the “Year of the Sheep” too.

The confusion stems from the Chinese character “yang”, which can translate in colloquial Chinese as either sheep or goat.

Those born in 1919, 1931, 1943, 1967, 1979, 1991 or 2003 are goats, who can count their lucky colours as brown, red and purple.

Their characters are supposedly kind and peaceable, while their best months are supposedly August and November and their lucky flowers are primroses and carnations.”

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is a graduate of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY, an alumna of the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas, and recently received her State Nail Technology License.

• • •
February 18, 2015

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“Stinky (Looking Dignified)”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

Foundling Stinky‘s first sighting was while sitting in in the feral cats’ communal dry food bowl in the yard of Suzanne Scott and Mark Baxter’s home. (Suzy and Mark are staunch supporters of felines and care for a largish household of cats. Stinky is the eldest.)

Stinky‘s former passions included painting (with his tail) and creating cat litter angels. He is currently maximizing his lounging potential. He’ll be 9 in July.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She’s good with all hep cats and kittens.

• • •
February 17, 2015

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“Honoring Tark”
Photograph by Alyssa Crame
February 12, 2015

February 12, Video Report by Sandy Kozel, Associated Press
“Students mourn loss of Jerry Tarkanian”

Native Las Vegan Alyssa Crame is a Journalism student at UNLV and current marketing and events intern with Greenspun Media Group. Crame is a lover of koalas, Justin Timberlake, and her favorite drink is milk. She once cried when she met a koala at Featherdale park in Australia. She hopes live in Sydney, Australia sometime in the future.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
February 16, 2015

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“Allure”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré
From the “Drive-By” Series.

The 41-story Allure condominium tower stands just west of the World’s Largest Gift Shop on the NW corner of Sahara & Las Vegas Boulevard.

• • •
February 15, 2015

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“Grand Canyon”
Aerial photograph by Vanessa Vobis. January 24, 2015.

“The Grand Canyon (Hopi: Ongtupqa; Yavapai: Wi:kaʼi:la, Spanish: Gran Cañón), is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the state of Arizona in the United States. It is contained within and managed by Grand Canyon National Park, the Hualapai Tribal Nation, the Havasupai Tribe and the Navajo Nation. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of the Grand Canyon area, and visited it on numerous occasions to hunt and enjoy the scenery.

The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and attains a depth of over a mile. Nearly two billion years of Earth’s geological history have been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests that the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to its present-day configuration.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Vanessa Vobis is a Los Angeles-based artist. Her ecological interests began while growing up in rural Germany “down the street from cow and chicken farms.” Later, after emigrating to Northern California and the award of art history and studio art degrees from UC Berkeley and the University of Iowa, she began filling art galleries with water, algae, and terrariums in exhibitions across the United States.

Her current research operates at the intersection of education, horticulture, and art. As a Program Manager at the LA County Natural History Museum Vanessa collaboratively produces field trips, workshops, lectures, and performances with scientists and partnering organizations.

She is the co-founder of LA Green Grounds, a non-profit that sets up front-yard vegetable gardens throughout South LA.

This is her second contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
February 14, 2015

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“Valentine’s Day Sweethearts”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

In celebration of the Feast of Saint Valentine, we feature Staci D. Linklater and James P. Reza. The talented and accomplished couple provide very modest bio notes: “Las Vegas natives. Downtown aficionados. Notorious party hosts.” We wish them and all Radiant City residents a very happy day.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer our all about that bass no treble valentine.

• • •
February 13, 2015

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“Binions”
Photograph by Jon Winet

“Binion was a product of his time and place. He was born in 1904 in a Texas backwater, had a bad second-grade education and spent his formative years traveling with horse traders and gamblers. Benny liked to say, ‘Tough times make tough people.’ As a racketeer in Depression-era Dallas he swam in the same sea of violence and desperation as everyone else. He wasn’t consumed by bloodlust — far from it. He was a canny, shrewd and pragmatic businessman, though he could barely read or write. He either controlled his rivals or had them killed. And after a tough day of being a crime boss, which might include ordering someone’s execution, he’d make it home in time to have dinner with his wife and kids.”

Excerpt from “An Unusual Gangster: Doug J. Swanson Talks About Benny Binion,”
a New York Times interview by John Williams of Doug Swanson, author of “Blood Aces: The Wild Ride of Benny Binion, the Texas Gangster Who Created Vegas Poker.”

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas.” Back in the day he enjoyed games of chance.

• • •
February 12, 2015

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“Blue Angel Over Debris”
Photograph by Kim Ulmanis

The photographer notes: “Although the motel itself is now gone, the beloved angel still watches over Las Vegas.”

More: February 2, 2015 News 3 Report by Denise Rosch:
“Despite redvelopement [sic] of hotel iconic, Blue Angel stays untouched”

Bio sketch provided by the writer | photographer: “Kim Ulmanis is your cliché coffee addicted writer and photographer residing in Las Vegas with her husband and mini zoo consisting of three cats and three rats. She is a journalism major at UNLV who wants to spend more time exploring and writing about all things Route 66. Often more caffeinated than need be, Kim can usually be found writing for her self-named blog.”

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies. This is Ms. Ulmanis’ second contribution to the Daily Frame.

• • •
February 11, 2015

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“Jana Lynch & Clarice Tara with Gallery Gal Pippi”
Preview Thursday, February 5, 2015
Photograph by Pam Stuckey
From the “Las Vegas Creatives Series.”

Jana Lynch is the owner of Jana’s RedRoom – “with her loving husband Kevin Stepp.”

Clarice Tara is President of Jana’s RedRoom Gallery Gals.

Gallery Gal Pippi is an Italian Greyhound.

From the gallery website:

Mission Statement: “Jana’s RedRoom is a working art studio and gallery. Our goal is to inspire the next generation of art collectors by offering original works at reasonable prices and, in turn, putting meaningful money into the hands of emerging and established local Las Vegas artists.

A little about us: Jana’s RedRoom got its start inside in the world famous Arts Factory in July of 2012. Jana first came up with the idea of the RedRoom after renting wall space for herself in the Arts Factory and letting other local artists use the space along side her free of charge. Realizing that there is a huge demographic of artists that have such talent and no outlet she then birthed the idea of the magnificent “Jana’s RedRoom.” Simply put her continual goal and theme is to have an avenue where emerging and established artists alike can come to display their creative soul. With her patchwork of magic through the array of small and large pieces she has built up an imaginative quilt of artistic creativity. Where many galleries charge to display art, Jana thinks it is crucial to never charge any artist to put their work up on her walls.

The arts community of Las Vegas is expanding more and more by the day and Jana’s RedRoom feels privileged to be a part of it. Supporting our local artists is our main goal. We consider everyone who steps foot into the RedRoom family. With a strong sense of community and an open heart to all, we welcome you to come check out the beauty that is Jana’s RedRoom.”

Daily Frame Contributor Pam Stuckey has been a resident of Las Vegas since 1990. She proudly identifies herself as “a volunteer and patron of Downtown Las Vegas.”

• • •
February 10, 2015

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“Second Star on the Right”
Photograph by Kim Ulmanis

Peter Pan Motel110 North 13th Street

More |Background: July 2, 2013 Las Vegas Sun story by Richard Lake:
“Tony Hsieh expands property portfolio with Peter Pan purchase”

The photographer provides the following thumbnail bio: Kim Ulmanis is your cliché coffee addicted writer and photographer residing in Las Vegas with her husband and mini zoo consisting of three cats and three rats. She is a journalism major at UNLV who wants to spend more time exploring and writing about all things Route 66. Often more caffeinated than need be, Kim can usually be found writing for her self-named blog.

“Our Las Vegas” is delighted to work with students in Professor Mary Hausch‘s classes in the UNLV Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies.

• • •
February 9, 2015

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“Freeway Animal”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“The Nevada Department of Transportation has a warning for motorists: Beware of giant animals near a Las Vegas freeway beginning Friday.

It’s not the filming of a Hollywood movie or a science experience gone wrong; it’s freeway art. Crews are expected to begin installing giant animal sculptures along the sides of Interstate 15 in the southern valley early Friday morning.”

Text from June 23, 2011 Las Vegas Sun story by Kyle B. Hansen, “Herd of sculptures to populate I-15 path: 40 metallic beasts to greet motorists as part of landscaping project.”

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
February 8, 2015

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“Hoover Dam”.
Photograph by Vanessa Vobis .

“Construction began in 1931 and Hoover Dam was completed in 1936. It still stands tall as an engineering marvel high above the Colorado River between Arizona and Nevada. Hoover Dam attracts over 7 million visitors from around the new world every year feeding vast tourism into the Las Vegas Nevada and Arizona economy.

The building of Hoover Dam took the brilliance of over 200 engineers to pull-off what many deemed as almost impossible. And it was the fortitude of over 7,000 dam workers that endured amazingly harsh conditions and extreme dangers to complete Hoover Dam almost two years ahead of schedule.”

Text from “Hoover Dam: A Treasure of Arizona, Nevada & The World.”

MORE: “Hoover Dam” Men, Women & Children of Hoover Dam Lest We Never Forget”

Vanessa Vobis is a Los Angeles-based artist. Her ecological interests began while growing up in rural Germany “down the street from cow and chicken farms.” Later, after emigrating to Northern California and the award of art history and studio art degrees from UC Berkeley and the University of Iowa, she began filling art galleries with water, algae, and terrariums in exhibitions across the United States.

Her current research operates at the intersection of education, horticulture, and art. As a Program Manager at the LA County Natural History Museum Vanessa collaboratively produces field trips, workshops, lectures, and performances with scientists and partnering organizations.

She is the co-founder of LA Green Grounds, a non-profit that sets up front-yard vegetable gardens throughout South LA.

She has spent some memorable moments in Las Vegas.

• • •
February 7, 2015

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“Imagine Dragons”. February 4, 2015.
Photograph by Pam Stuckey .

From ““Imagine Dragons’ Grammy performance downtown is not a public event” Feb. 2, 2015 Las Vegas Sun story by John Katsilometes:

“It turns out the hubbub on Fremont East for Sunday’s Grammy Awards telecast starring Imagine Dragons is more akin to a music video than rock concert.

As a temporary stage and surrounding structure is being built on Fremont Street at 6th Street, between El Cortez and Backstage Bar & Billiards, officials with the production stress that this is not a traditional public concert.

It is a closed performance in an enclosed venue that will look a little like a water tower with a Target logo at the top. The national retail chain is the sponsor of Sunday’s 57th Annual Grammy Awards being broadcast from Nokia Theater in Los Angeles at 8 p.m. on CBS.”

Daily Frame Contributor Pam Stuckey has been a resident of Las Vegas since 1990. She proudly identifies herself as “a volunteer and patron of Downtown Las Vegas.”

• •
February 6, 2015

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“Motel Full Moon”. February 2, 2015.
Photograph by JOn Miller.

13th and East Fremont Street.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

He notes: “I always go outside and look at the sky as I drink my cup of tea before bed … I am never disappointed.”

Editor’s note: Along with many of JOn’s photographs, “Lucky Moon,” a January 5, 2015 variation on this subject is featured in the Daily Frame Archive. Search on the page for his name – or scroll down to see all previous Daily Frames.

• • •
February 5, 2015

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“Science”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.

The Writers Block is now open – and keen to serve your independent bookseller’s needs. 1020 Fremont Street. A great new addition to DTLV.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. Her life is a page-turner.

• • •
February 4, 2015

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“Topper”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

“Topper” is named for the Clash’s drummer as well as for Topper the Ghost. He the only survivor from his litter.

Topper enjoys jazz, chewing on the corners of hard cover books, and whatever cashmere sweater his guardian, writer-cultural critic Lissa Towsend Rodgers. Word has it he is “a very good boy” with “a serious penchant for laps.”

His eyebrows are eloquent.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. One more than suspects she is a closet Cat Lady in training.

• • •
February 3, 2015

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“El Chiltepin”
Photograph by Jon Winet.

515 E Oakey Blvd. Las Vegas.

“Chiltepin is a perennial shrub that usually grows to a height of around 1 m (3.3 ft), but sometimes reaches 3 m (9.8 ft).[3] and in areas without hard frost in winter, plants can live 35-50 years.

The tiny chili peppers of C. a. var. glabriusculum are red to orange-red, usually slightly ellipsoidal, and about 0.31 in in diameter. … Tepin peppers are extremely hot, measuring between 50,000 and 100,000 Scoville units.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas.” He hopes tacos al pastor are on the menu.”

• • •
February 2, 2015

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“Downtown Apartment Interior”
Photograph by JOn Miller.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
February 1, 2015

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“McCarran Tarmac Nightfall”
Photograph by JOn Miller.

“Tarmac (short for tarmacadam, or tar-penetration macadam) is a type of road surfacing material patented by Edgar Purnell Hooley in 1901. The term is also used, with varying degrees of correctness, for a variety of other materials, including tar-grouted macadam, bituminous surface treatments, and modern asphalt concrete. The term is also often used incorrectly to describe airport aprons, ‘ramps’, and runways.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Frame, serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
January 31, 2015

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“Downtown Parking”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi.

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is a graduate of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY, an alumna of the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas, and recently received her State Nail Technology License.

• • •
January 30, 2015

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Container Park Sunset no. 2”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas.

We’re delighted to publish a complement to the artist | photographer’s January 10, 2015 Daily Frame. Along with 304 others, the earlier image is available in the Daily Frame Archive.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery and at Jana’s Red Room. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
January 29, 2015

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“Federal Courthouse Study no. 3”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse

Although Judge Lloyd Dee George, after whom the courthouse is named still serves as one its judges, the Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Nevada. is Gloria M. Navarro. We learn from the Courthouse website that:

“Judge Navarro was nominated by President Barack Obama on December 24, 2009 to United States District Judge for the District of Nevada. She was confirmed by a unanimous vote of the U.S. Senate on May 5, 2010 (Cinco de Mayo) and took the oath as a United States District Judge on May 25, 2010. She was recommended for the bench by the Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid while she was serving as a Chief Deputy District Attorney for Clark County in the Civil Division where she defended Clark County and the Board of County Commissioners from various civil lawsuits, including section 1983 Civil Rights cases and Employment Law cases from 2005 to 2010. She litigated cases primarily in federal court and the Ninth Circuit and also litigated a civil trial in state court using a rarely used statute and successfully removed the Clark County Recorder from elected office for acts of criminal misconduct. On January 1, 2014, Judge Navarro became Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Nevada.

Prior to joining the District Attorney’s Office, Judge Navarro was a Clark County Deputy Special Public Defender from 2001-2005 exclusively representing indigent clients charged with murder and facing the death penalty. During this time, she was also named Pro Bono Public Lawyer of the Year, an honor that was awarded by the State Bar of Nevada Access to Justice Committee.

Judge Navarro is a Las Vegas native of Cuban descent who is fluent in Spanish. She has authored several articles, including ‘Cultural Factors and the Voluntariness of Statements’ and ‘Criminal Defense and the Consequences of Immigration Law.’ Judge Navarro has also been a speaker for the Criminal Justice Act Panel Attorneys on the topic of ‘How to Effectively Represent Non-English Speaking Clients and/or Clients with a Different Cultural Background.’”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She is a sound judge of character.

• • •
January 28, 2015

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“Gracie on New Year’s Eve”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.
December 31, 2013
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

From our QA Team we learned that due to a human error, last Wednesday’s edition of our Las Vegas Pets Series featuring Gracie went straight to the Daily Frame Archive. To both correct this mistake – and in light of the overwhelming amount of attention her picture got on the “Our Las Vegas” Facebook page, we are delighted to spotlight her again.

We do note that not a lot has changed in Gracie’s life in the past week, so without updates we are running her bio again. From artist | photographer | guardian Kathleen Nathan:

“Gracie was born September 11, 2001 in Minnesota. She was adopted in Las Vegas in December 2001. She had a brother, Wilbur, who was adopted at the same time to the same family in Nevada. Gracie has lived in Las Vegas; Laguna Beach, California; Brooklyn, New York; and Woodgate in the Empire State’s Adirondack Mountains.

Gracie is retired and is now living back in Las Vegas. Her hobbies include eating, sleeping, hanging out with the boss, eating, squirrels (!), and the occasional mugging of a garbage can.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. Count her among Gracie’s many fans and admirers.

• • •
January 27, 2015

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“Federal Courthouse Study no. 2”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse

“Lloyd Dee George (born February 22, 1930) is a United States federal judge.

Born in Montpelier, Idaho, George was raised in Las Vegas, and was the class president of the 1948 class of Las Vegas High School. He received a B.S. from Brigham Young University in 1955 and, after serving in the U.S. Air Force from 1955 to 1958, received a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law in 1961. He was in private practice in Las Vegas, Nevada from 1961 to 1974, and was also a justice of the peace for Clark County, Nevada from 1962 to 1969. He was U.S. Bankruptcy Judge for the District of Nevada from 1974–1984, serving on the Ninth Circuit U.S. Bankruptcy Appellate Panels from 1980 to 1984.

On April 18, 1984, George was nominated by President Ronald Reagan to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Nevada vacated by Roger D. Foley. George was confirmed by the United States Senate on April 30, 1984, and received his commission on May 3, 1984. He served as chief judge from 1992 to 1997, and assumed senior status on December 1, 1997.

George is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He served as a missionary in Wisconsin and Illinois for the Church. The Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse in Las Vegas, Nevada is named in his honor as well as the State Bar of Nevada’s Lloyd D. George Professionalism Award and the William S. Boyd School of Law’s Judge Lloyd George Bankruptcy Moot Court Competition.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. As noted in yesterday’s edition of the Daily Frame, now featured in the Daily Frame Archive, she has performed at the Courthouse.

• • •
January 26, 2015

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“Federal Courthouse Study no. 1”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“The United States District Court for the District of Nevada (in case citations, D. Nev.) is the federal district court whose jurisdiction is the state of Nevada. The court has locations in Las Vegas and Reno.

The Lloyd D. George Federal District Courthouse is the home for the district court in Las Vegas. The building of the courthouse was completed in 2002 and was the first federal building built to comply with the post-Oklahoma City blast resistance requirements. Blast-resistance tests for the project were conducted at the Department of Defense’s Large Blast Thermal Simulator in White Sands, New Mexico to validate building performance under blast loads.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She was not Mirandized when she performed in December at a monthly Friday concert at the Courthouse. The U.S. Marshals and City of Las Vegas partner on this civic, cultural project.

The next concert is on Friday, February 20, Noon – 1 p.m. in the Jury Room and will feature the Firenze Strings with Li Lin Hong and Zhang Hai Yue celebrating the Year of the Sheep with “Music from China and Beyond.”

• • •
January 25, 2015

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“Stratosphere Sunset”
Photograph by Ellie Mendré.

“The original design envisioned the Stratosphere exceeding the height of the CN Tower in Toronto (1,815 ft) to become the tallest freestanding structure in the world at that time. However, due to the FAA’s concerns about possible interference with nearby McCarran International Airport, and any possible flights that come through Las Vegas, the Tower’s proposed height shrank multiple times, bringing it to its current height of 1,149 ft.”

Text from Wikipedia.

A Texas transplant and resident of Las Vegas since 2002, Daily Frame contributor Ellie Mendré is a massage therapist with interests in photography, sculpture & drawing. When not fearlessly exploring southern Nevada on her days off, she enjoys bocce, cats, antiquing & a good latte.

• • •
January 24, 2015

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“From the Pint”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi.

Inspire is a theater and multi-venue complex situated in the center of downtown Las Vegas at LV Boulevard and Fremont Street. With the emphasis on learning, meeting, entertainment, dynamic programming, and unique guest experiences, Inspire has much to offer including; convention/conference space, multiple cocktail bars, outdoor patio areas, a News Cafe, 150-seat theater, and roof-top bar and beer garden. Open to the public Monday-Saturday, Inspire is a place to meet, gather, work, learn, relax and enjoy. Please explore the different venues and offerings we have, and don’t forget to check out our membership opportunities!”

Inspire is part of the Future Restaurant Group.

Text in quotes from Inspire website.

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is a graduate of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY, an alumna of the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas, and recently received her State Nail Technology License.

• • •
January 23, 2015

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“Skate Park Dusk”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
Justice Myron E. Leavitt And Jaycee Community Park

From Wikipedia:
“Skateboarding is an action sport which involves riding and performing tricks using a skateboard. Skateboarding can also be considered a recreational activity, an art form, a job, or a method of transportation. Skateboarding has been shaped and influenced by many skateboarders throughout the years. A 2009 report found that the skateboarding market is worth an estimated $4.8 billion in annual revenue with 11.08 million active skateboarders in the world.

Since the 1970s, skateparks have been constructed specifically for use by skateboarders, Freestyle BMXers, aggressive skaters, and very recently, scooters.”

More: Action video by Ralfie Garcia harvested from YouTube.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She favors longboards.

• • •
January 22, 2015

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“Motel Demolition”
Photograph by Glenn Elliott.
January 16, 2015

“Now that demolition of the dilapidated Mid-Century buildings is underway—the Vegas Motel razed this week and Blue Angel Motel up next—Arnold Stalk, planning and development consultant for owners of both properties, reiterates that plans to preserve the signs remain. The Angel, he says, is mounted on a pole and will stay when the building is gone. (Imagine a giant swizzle stick.)”

— From Kristen Peterson January 14, 2015 Las Vegas Weekly story “Bye, Blue Angel Motel: Motel Comes Down, but the Iconic Figurehead will remain.”

Las Vegan Glenn Elliott was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from Cal State Fullerton with a degree in art, and for the past seven years has pursued his photography practice. He is the director of Generator Photography and frequent contributor to the Daily Frame.

• • •
January 21, 2015

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“Gracie”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.
From the Wednesday Las Vegas Pets Series.

From artist | photographer | guardian Kathleen Nathan: “Gracie was born September 11, 2001 in Minnesota. She was adopted in Las Vegas in December 2001. She had a brother, Wilbur, who was adopted at the same time to the same family in Nevada. Gracie has lived in Las Vegas; Laguna Beach, California; Brooklyn, New York; and Woodgate in the Empire State’s Adirondack Mountains.

Gracie is retired and is now living back in Las Vegas. Her hobbies include eating, sleeping, hanging out with the boss, eating, squirrels (!), and the occasional mugging of a garbage can.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. In a parallel universe she has a house full of cats supervised by a pair of Cardigan Welsh corgis.

• • •
January 20, 2015

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“Golden Nugget Construction Site”
Photograph by Ginger Brunner.

“A hefty portion of the casino is getting seriously tore up! Yes, that’s the technical term.

The construction is part of ongoing enhancements to Golden Nugget’s legendary casino.”

Text from story in Vital Vegas, “A Cavalcade of New Things Are in the Works at Golden Nugget Las Vegas.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She a regular at Downtown’s parking ramps.

• • •
January 19, 2015

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“City Hall Gnome”
Photograph by Lisa Stamanis.
September 2012

As noted in a May 1, 2012 City of Las Vegas media release, “Titled by the artist, ‘Gnot the Proper Gnomenclature,’ the artwork features one reclining lawn gnome, 8 to 9 feet across, which rises about 5 feet tall at its peak. A second gnome stands 9 feet tall. After carving them from a dense foam material, the artwork is hard-coated, painted and sealed. While the sculptures are durable, they are only temporary and stepping and climbing on the art is discouraged. Smigel credits mentor Keith Conley, a sculpture professor at the College of Southern Nevada, for the inspiration with whom he collaborated on a large standing gnome years ago.”

The release continues: “Las Vegas native Jesse Carson Smigel is a theatrical set designer and carpenter, sculptor, and co-owner of Blackbird Studios, who studied art at both CSN and UNLV. His work has been seen in the stage sets of numerous local productions. Specializing in foam carving, some might be familiar with the atomic Mushroom Cloud he sculpted for the recent exhibit “Building Atomic Vegas” at the National Atomic Testing Museum.”

Many of you will have seen “Snowball in Vegas,” the artist’s 10-foot-tall cat head installed in 2014 at the corner of First Street and Coolidge Avenue.

Artist Lisa Stamanis serves as Cultural Programming Urban Arts | Special Projects staff for the City of Las Vegas Office of Cultural Affairs. She has played a vital role in the development of arts and culture in the Radiant City for over twenty-five years.

Although Lisa is currently on leave, her presence can be felt and seen across the City.

• • •
January 18, 2015

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“Blue Diamond”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi.

According to Wikipedia: “Blue Diamond is a census-designated place (CDP) in Clark County, Nevada.

As of the census of 2000, there were 282 people, 118 households, and 77 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 38.3 people per square mile. There were 125 housing units at an average density of 17.0 per square mile.”

(Note that the population ballooned to 290 in the 2010 census.)

The photographer adds additional information and observations: “Blue Diamond is such an interesting little town. Shacks and opulent custom built houses right down the street from each other, at the base of the mountains. My friend Anne (who lives in BD) said the burro is supposed to be playing a guitar, but we both agree he looks more like he’s into hara kiri.”

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is a graduate of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY, an alumna of the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas, and recently received her State Nail Technology License.

• • •
January 17, 2015

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“Prospector”
Photograph by Jon Winet.

As noted on Patty’s Vicarious Travel webpage:
“Old West Prospector at entrance to Freemont Street Experience, Las Vegas
The gold nuggets “glow” in the dark during evening hours

One of many large and wacky statues and signs in this area.”

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas.” He has never panned for gold.

• • •
January 16, 2015

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“Stratosphere Dusk”
Photograph by JOn Miller.

“The stratosphere is a region of intense interactions among radiative, dynamical, and chemical processes, in which the horizontal mixing of gaseous components proceeds much more rapidly than in vertical mixing.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to “Our Las Vegas,” serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
January 15, 2015

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“Liberty”
Photograph by Jon Winet.

Las Vegas’ best known Statue of Liberty is of course the one gracing the exterior of the New York New York Hotel and Casino on the Strip but we have a fondness for the one on the 4200 block of West Sahara – and not just because it’s the best landmark for Osaka, the City’s self-proclaimed oldest Japanese restaurant.

Those looking to visit all the reproductions of Lady Liberty will find the following Wikipedia entry helpful: Replicas of the Statue of Liberty.

Jon Winet directs “Our Las Vegas.” He wishes he’d taken this photograph.

• • •
January 14, 2015

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“The Shops at Crystals”
Photograph by Adam Yurkunas.

“‘The largest collection of high-end fashion stores under one roof in the world.’
– In Magazine”

Text from Crystals website..

“Our Las Vegas” contributor Adam Yurkunas was born and raised in a small town in western Massachusetts. He joined the Marine Corps after high school then moved to Las Vegas in 1999. He notes: “Although I’ve always been interested in photography, I only started shooting last January when I bought my first DSLR camera. Since then the lens has opened my eyes to an entirely new view of our city and its surrounding areas.”

• • •
January 13, 2015

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“AND”
Photograph by Jon Winet. October 2013.

“A hotel is an establishment that provides lodging paid on a short-term basis. Facilities provided may range from a basic bed and storage for clothing, to luxury features like en-suite bathrooms. Larger hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business center, childcare, conference facilities and social function services. Hotel rooms are usually numbered (or named in some smaller hotels and B&Bs) to allow guests to identify their room.”

Text from Wikipedia.

Jon Winet does his best to thoughtfully direct “Our Las Vegas.” His first camera was a late era Kodak Brownie.

• • •
January 12, 2015

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“Fremont Street View no. 3”
Photograph by JOn Miller.

“Las Vegas, Nevada: World’s Largest Pint Glass”
“The giant pint glass of Bass beer on Fremont Street is inhabited by Hennessey’s Tavern. ‘Come Party in the Pint.'”

Text from RoadsideAmerica.com.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to “Our Las Vegas,” serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
January 11, 2015

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“Gateway to Death”
Photograph by Andrea Lipomi. December 26, 2014.

“For years, the iconic tower lit up the desert horizon until neglect and power prices shut it down. But thanks to one family’s determination, the thermometer is coming back.

The world’s tallest thermometer proudly coaxed drivers to stop a while in Baker until a few years ago, when the lights went dark and the temperature shone no more.

The thermometer’s 134-foot height represents the hottest temperature recorded in the Northern Hemisphere: 134 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature was recorded right next door in Death Valley in July 1913.”

More from KSNV-TV Channel 3 April 24, 2014 story by Denise Rosch.

Daily Frame contributor Andrea Lipomi is the director | owner of Feetish Spa, located at Emergency Arts in Downtown Las Vegas. She is a graduate of the Onondaga School of Therapeutic Massage in Rochester, NY, an alumna of the Esthetics Program at Destination Academy in Las Vegas, and recently received her State Nail Technology License.

• • •
January 10, 2015

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“Container Park Sunset”
Photograph by Sallie Douglas

“Our Las Vegas” does its best to track developments Downtown and across the Radiant City. We encourage you to visit our Facebook page to read some recent posts about the history, present and future of the City. While you there if you haven’t yet, we welcome your “like” of the page.

Our thanks to all for your support.

Daily Frame contributor Sallie Douglas writes: “I am a native of Las Vegas. I attended St. Anne’s school with our own talented and loved artist Anthony Bondi and graduated from Valley High school in 1972.

I have been an aesthetician at Spa Bellagio since its opening 15 years ago. I am also a certified Ayurvedic Practitioner, and now have become an abstract artist as well! My work is exhibited at City of the World Gallery on Casino Center and Colorado. Much of it is inspired by our beautiful sunrises and sunsets.”

• • •
January 9, 2015

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“From the 59th Floor of the West Tower of the Cosmopolitan”
Photograph by Adam Yurkunas

“Our Las Vegas” contributor Adam Yurkunas was born and raised in a small town in western Massachusetts. He joined the Marine Corps after high school then moved to Las Vegas in 1999. He notes: “Although I’ve always been interested in photography, I only started shooting last January when I bought my first DSLR camera. Since then the lens has opened my eyes to an entirely new view of our city and its surrounding areas.”

• • •
January 8, 2015

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“CES Party”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner

By the numbers: according to the International Consumer Electronics Show website, the 2015 CES event has 2015 160,498 attendees including 40,628 international attendees from over 140 countries; 6,575 accredited media; 2,670 financial professionals; and 3,673 exhibitors. CES covers 2.06 million square feet of exhibit space at multiple sites.

The event features 20000+ new product announcements, among which are Marshall’s new headphones. The legendary amplifier company hosted a performance of Tenacious D. Our Las Vegas Lead Photographer writes: “I was 15 feet away and only saw arms and screens.”

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She was on the guest list for the Tenacious D event.

• • •
January 7, 2015

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“L’amour: Plus fort que la haine” “
Photo illustration by “Our Las Vegas”.

Reprinted in its entirety from the New Yorker

“The Attack on Charlie Hebdo”
BY AMY DAVIDSON

In 2011, just six days after the Paris office of Charlie Hebdo, a French satirical magazine under threat for having run cartoons of the prophet Mohammed, was gutted by a firebomb, the staff put out a new issue with a cover drawing of a bearded, presumably Muslim man kissing a cartoonist. The caption was “L’amour: Plus fort que la haine,” which translates to “Love: Stronger than hate.” The cartoon was a properly irreverent combination—an affirmation of the most universal truth, a commitment to the magazine’s own very particular identity. To be brave, one needn’t ever be saccharine. The magazine and its artists, editors, and staff believed in all of that and lived those values, in a way that few of us are ever asked to. At midday this Wednesday, ten of them were killed, along with two Paris policemen who rushed to their aid when what were reportedly two or three hooded men, armed with AK-47s—some of the details are not yet clear—went into the office, in Paris’s Eleventh Arrondissement, and started firing, apparently at anyone they could find. In addition to the dead, twenty people were injured, according to French police statements. There is a video in which the gunmen can be heard shouting “Allahu Akbar”—God is great. This was, as President François Hollande said after rushing to the scene, “undoubtedly an act of terrorism.” And, though the exact identity of the shooters will need to be determined, in these first hours there are strong signs that it is an act of Islamist terrorism.

The dead include Stéphane Charbonnier, who used the pen name Charb and was the very brave editor of Charlie Hebdo; the cartoonists Jean Cabut (who signed his work Cabu), Bernard Verlhac (Tignous), and Georges Wolinski; and the columnist Bernard Maris. (Other names have not been released; I’ll add them as they become available.) They were assassinated. The gunmen were not on a suicide mission; they fled and stole a car, which the latest reports suggest has been located in the Twentieth Arrondissement. (The Guardian and others have live updates; these include video clips of a shoot-out.) The gunmen were still at large in Paris, as of the early afternoon there, and presumably armed. Children were evacuated from schools near the Charlie Hebdo office, which was in the same building as at least one other media organization. Some workers in the building managed to hide from the shooters, but it was, reportedly, a production day at the magazine, busy and crowded. This was an attack on a publication and a neighborhood, a country and its press, and on any journalist, in any city. The magazine made fun of people—of many faiths, for many follies, which we all need to be reminded that we have. Some of the cartoons were blatantly, roughly sexual, and not designed to endear them to Jews or Christians. Satire was Charlie Hebdo’s mission, and a necessary one. There were times when the French government asked the magazine to hold back, but the magazine kept being itself, which is what one wishes for in a free press. Wednesday’s crime should not cause anyone to second-guess Charlie Hebdo’s editorial decisions. Silence is not where the answers to an incident like this lie.

Recently, the magazine had mocked the Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham, or ISIS. The last tweet on the magazine’s account before news of the attack was of a cartoon of the group’s leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. As the BBC noted, there are questions about its exact timing and provenance. But making fun of al-Baghdadi is not recklessness; it’s how one knows that ISIS has not won, and never will. There ought to be more tweets that do so.* (Whether ISIS in particular had a role in this attack is a question that can’t be answered at this stage; its members are, sadly, not the only ones in the terrorism business.) The current issue of Charlie Hebdo, published the day of the shooting, featured a caricature of the novelist Michel Houellebecq on the cover. Houellebecq’s new novel, “Submission,” also out Wednesday, according to the Times, “predicts a future France run by Muslims, in which women forsake Western dress and polygamy is introduced.” The drawing of Houellebecq, accompanied by a joke about Ramadan, is not flattering. The French police have added the protection of Houellebecq to their list of priorities on what is, by all accounts, a traumatic and disorienting day for the entire country. He deserves safety, and not chastisement. Barack Obama, David Cameron, and Angela Merkel have all quickly condemned the attack and the wider assault on the press. The rector of Paris’s Grand Mosque added his voice, saying, according to the Times, “We are horrified. … Our community is stunned by what just happened. It’s a whole section of our democracy that is seriously affected.”

France, it will be said in the next days, has failed, in a profound way, when it comes to making sense of its own diversity. What will be strongly debated is the nature of that failure, and what its opposite might look like. Marine Le Pen, the leader of the National Front, will, inevitably, offer one set of answers, with her characteristic, glossy coat on her much uglier injunctions that often add up to the same thing. Who in France, and in other countries, whose policies and commitment to a free press were, again, targeted in the attack on Charlie Hebdo, is going to come forward with other, better answers? This is a dangerous moment for France, both in the frighteningly immediate sense—there are armed terrorists loose in the capital—and because the decisions that a nation makes at a time of terror are not always the best ones, for anybody. “L’amour: Plus fort que la haine,” as Charlie Hebdo put it years ago—and what makes that line meaningful, and not some trite filler of empty air in a shot-up office—is remembering who you are.

Our hearts and thoughts go out to the staff of Charlie Hebdo – and Parisians and journalists worldwide.

• • •
January 6, 2015

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“Holiday Lights Last Gasp”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.
January 4, 2015

“In 567 the Council of Tours proclaimed that the entire period between Christmas and Epiphany should be considered part of the celebration, creating what became known as the twelve days of Christmas, or what the English called Christmastide. On the last of the twelve days, called Twelfth Night, various cultures developed a wide range of additional special festivities. …”

Quote from Bruce Forbes’ “Christmas: A Candid History,” cited on Wikipedia.

Ginger Bruner is “Our Las Vegas'” Lead Photographer. She keeps track of the City’s lights.

• • •
January 5, 2015

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“Lucky Moon”
Photograph by JOn Miller.
November 2014

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to “Our Las Vegas,” serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran. He also has a great eye for the sites and sights of Downtown.

• • •
January 4, 2015

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“Golden Nugget | Wolf Moon”
Photograph by JOn Miller.
January 3, 2015

“If you’re looking for a push to set your newly created goals and New Year’s resolutions into motion, the first Full Moon of 2015—the Wolf Moon—will not disappoint.

It packs a powerful planetary punch and delivers just the right mix of “driving” energy to give us a kick start to the year ahead.

The signs of Cancer and Capricorn will be highlighted at the peak of this Full Moon which takes place on Jan. 4, 2015. The energy of Cancer (our caretaker within) and Capricorn (our ambitious side) will come out in full swing. We might feel the tug to balance these two sides in order to get ahead and do what we intended to do.

There will also be a push happening behind the scenes – which you might call an unconscious drive. Transformational Pluto will make a show stopper appearance at the peak of this Full Moon empowering us to get things done. We’re ready to say goodbye to old patterns of the past that we’ve already determined don’t work for us.

That Capricorn push will help us put our foot down and say, ‘It’s time to take a stand and achieve my goals.'”

Text from Yoganonymous website.

Photographer and artist JOn Miller has lived in Las Vegas since February 2011. He is a frequent contributor to “Our Las Vegas,” serving as our Lunar Expert and Man at McCarran.

• • •
January 3, 2015

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“Biker”
Photograph by Ginger Bruner.

“Cycling, also called bicycling or biking, is the use of bicycles for transport, recreation, or for sport. …

Bicycles were introduced in the 19th century and now number about one billion worldwide.They are the principal means of transportation in many parts of the world.

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